February

 

 

 

 

 


1 February

The Golem: How He Came Into The World (Dir. Carl Boese/Paul Wegener, Ger, 1920) (Screening Format – DCP, 94mins) The only one of three films directed by and starring Paul Wegener concerning the Golem, a figure from Jewish folklore, to have survived, this is, along with The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari (Robert Wiene, 1920), one of the key works of Expressionism, as well as being one of the earliest and most influential horror films. In medieval Prague, Rabbi Loew fears disaster for the Jewish community at the hands of the Christian Emperor. To defend his people, he creates from clay the Golem, whose awakening leads to a series of disasters in this visual feast.  Find out more atfilmmonthly.com . With a new score by composer Paul Robinson, performed live by his HarmonieBand. Square Chapel, Halifax  Link

2 February

The Golem: How He Came Into The World  (Dir. Carl Boese/Paul Wegener, Ger, 1920) (Screening Format – DCP, 94mins) The only one of three films directed by and starring Paul Wegener concerning the Golem, a figure from Jewish folklore, to have survived, this is, along with The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari (Robert Wiene, 1920), one of the key works of Expressionism, as well as being one of the earliest and most influential horror films. In medieval Prague, Rabbi Loew fears disaster for the Jewish community at the hands of the Christian Emperor. To defend his people, he creates from clay the Golem, whose awakening leads to a series of disasters in this visual feast.  Find out more atfilmmonthly.com . With a new score by composer Paul Robinson, performed live by his HarmonieBand.  Showroom Cinema, Sheffield Link

3 February

He Who Gets Slapped (Dir. Victor Sjostrom, US, 1924) (Screening format – 35mm, 94mins) Paul Beaumont (Lon Chaney) is a talented scientist who has laboured for years to develop his theories on the origin of mankind.  But on the eve of delivering the results of his research to the wider scientific community, Beaumont’s wife Marie and his wealthy patron Baron Regnard (Mark McDermott) conspire to steal his papers and the Baron himself claims the credit for Beaumont’s work.  When Beaumont seeks redress he is slapped by the Baron and humiliated in front of the scientific community.  Five years pass and Beaumont, now known only as ‘He’, is working as a circus clown in an act which consists of his getting slapped every evening by other clowns.  He gradually falls in love with Consuelo (Norma Shearer) another performer but when he learns that she is to be forcibly married to baron Regard, the scene is set for high drama.  A big critical and popular success on its first release, the film set a one-day world record with $15,000 in ticket sales, a one-week record of $71,900, and a two-week record of $121,574. The New York Times described the film as “… a picture which defies one to write about it without indulging in superlatives … so beautifully told, so flawlessly directed that we imagine it will be held up as a model by all producers.” Find out more at sensesofcinema.com.  With live piano accompaniment by Taz Modi.  Barbican, London Link

The Golem: How He Came Into The World (Dir. Carl Boese/Paul Wegener, Ger, 1920) (Screening Format – DCP, 94mins) The only one of three films directed by and starring Paul Wegener concerning the Golem, a figure from Jewish folklore, to have survived, this is, along with The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari (Robert Wiene, 1920), one of the key works of Expressionism, as well as being one of the earliest and most influential horror films. In medieval Prague, Rabbi Loew fears disaster for the Jewish community at the hands of the Christian Emperor. To defend his people, he creates from clay the Golem, whose awakening leads to a series of disasters in this visual feast.  Find out more atfilmmonthly.com . With a new score by composer Paul Robinson, performed live by his HarmonieBand. Home 2, Manchester Link

6 February

The Lovers of an Old Criminal (aka An Old Gangster’s Moll) (Dir. Svatopluk Innemann, Cz, 1927) This is a restored Czech crazy slapstick comedy about the factory owner Mr Pardon and his uncle Mr Monday, who swap their identities and inventincredible stories to escape marriage and be with their beloveds. Starring one of Alfred Hitchcock’s muses Anny Ondra and “the King of Czech Comedians” Vlasta Burian, this silent movie excels for its original slapstick, especially the mélange of invented murders, chases, and doppelgänger scenes. Find out more at filmovyprehled.czPresented by the Kennington Bioscope.  With live piano accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, LondonLink

7 February

Crossroads Of Youth (Dir. Ahn Jong-hwa, Korea, 1934) (Screening format – DCP, 73 Mins) Launching a BFI season on early Korean film, this screening is preceded by a richly illustrated talk from Chung Chong-hwa (Senior Researcher, Korean Film Archive) on the history of early film-making in Korea. Chung will discuss the complex journey to discovering these Early Korean Cinema prints, as well as their filmic and historical significance. Crossroads of Youth is the oldest surviving Korean film. This tale of love, desire, betrayal and revenge follows a young man as he seeks his fortune on the streets of Seoul. Find out more at notcoming.com.  With live musical accompaniment from composer Park Chun-hwi, ‘byeonsa’ narration from Cho Hee-bong and live supplementary performances from actors Hwang Min-su and Park Hee-von, recreating an experience comparable to what Korean audiences saw and heard when it first premiered in 1934.  BFI Southbank, London Link

8 February

Wonder of Creation(Dir. Hanns Walter Kornblum, Ger, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 92mins)  The extraordinary silent documentary, Wunder der Schöpfung (‘Wonder of Creation’), is a unique document of human knowledge about the world and the universe in the 1920s. Fifteen special effects experts and nine cameramen were involved in the production of this beautifully tinted and toned film that combines documentary scenes, historical documents, fiction elements, animation scenes and educational impact.Wunder der Schöpfung is a classic example of German Kulturfilm, which predate documentaries as we know them today. They were often high-quality productions involving collaboration between mainstream film-makers and academics.Wunder der Schöpfung gives us a glimpse of astronomical knowledge circa 1925, it cleverly uses trick photography and animation to visualise scientific theories.  Find out more at wikipedia.org.  With live musical accompaniment by Herschel 36 (musicians Stu Brown and Paul Harrison) reprising their acclaimed score for the film, commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival in 2016.  An Lanntair, Shetland Link

9 February

Wonder of Creation (Dir. Hanns Walter Kornblum, Ger, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 92mins)  The extraordinary silent documentary, Wunder der Schöpfung (‘Wonder of Creation’), is a unique document of human knowledge about the world and the universe in the 1920s. Fifteen special effects experts and nine cameramen were involved in the production of this beautifully tinted and toned film that combines documentary scenes, historical documents, fiction elements, animation scenes and educational impact. Wunder der Schöpfung is a classic example of German Kulturfilm, which predate documentaries as we know them today. They were often high-quality productions involving collaboration between mainstream film-makers and academics. Wunder der Schöpfung gives us a glimpse of astronomical knowledge circa 1925, it cleverly uses trick photography and animation to visualise scientific theories.  Find out more at wikipedia.org.  With live musical accompaniment by Herschel 36 (musicians Stu Brown and Paul Harrison) reprising their acclaimed score for the film, commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival in 2016.  Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Sleat, Skye Link

The General  (Dir. Buster Keaton/Clyde Bruckman, 1926)  (Screening format – not known, 75mins)  Widely considered one of the greatest films ever made and one of the most revered comedies of the silent era, Buster Keaton’s effortless masterpiece sees hapless Southern railroad engineer Johnny Gray (Keaton) facing off against Union soldiers during the American Civil War. When Johnny’s fiancée, Annabelle Lee (Marion Mack), is accidentally taken away while on a train stolen by Northern forces, Gray pursues the soldiers, using various modes of transportation in comic action scenes that highlight Keaton’s boundless, innovative wit and joyful, lighthearted dexterity, to reclaim the train and thereby save the South. Find out more atbusterkeaton.com . With live piano accompaniment by Neil Brand.  St John’s Church, Epping Link

16 February

Wonder of Creation (Dir. Hanns Walter Kornblum, Ger, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 92mins)  The extraordinary silent documentary, Wunder der Schöpfung (‘Wonder of Creation’), is a unique document of human knowledge about the world and the universe in the 1920s. Fifteen special effects experts and nine cameramen were involved in the production of this beautifully tinted and toned film that combines documentary scenes, historical documents, fiction elements, animation scenes and educational impact. Wunder der Schöpfung is a classic example of German Kulturfilm, which predate documentaries as we know them today. They were often high-quality productions involving collaboration between mainstream film-makers and academics. Wunder der Schöpfung gives us a glimpse of astronomical knowledge circa 1925, it cleverly uses trick photography and animation to visualise scientific theories.  Find out more at wikipedia.org.  With live musical accompaniment by Herschel 36 (musicians Stu Brown and Paul Harrison) reprising their acclaimed score for the film, commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival in 2016.  The Harris, Preston Link

21 February

A Throw Of Dice (Dir. Franz Osten, In/Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 74mins) After the beautiful Sunita nurses Ranjit back to health following dramatic events during a royal tiger hunt, his wicked rival Sohat persuades him to risk his kingdom and his love in a fateful game of dice. A Throw of Dice (Prapancha Pash) is the third film in a pioneering trilogy of silent films made through a unique partnership between German director Franz Osten and Indian actor-producer Himansu Rai, whose films combined documentary techniques with narratives derived from Indian myths and legends. Shot on location in Rajasthan, the film features over 10,000 extras and an impressive array of horses, elephants and tigers. Its star actors all had major careers in Indian cinema and remain legendary and much-loved figures. Find out more at   memsaabstory.com.  A South West Silents presentation.  The evening will also include screenings of home movies from India from the British Empire and Commonwealth Collection.  With a brand new live musical accompaniment by pianist Stephen Horne and Jeevan Singh on percussion (tabla & dhol).  Museum & Art Gallery, Bristol Link

22 February

The Beloved Rogue (Dir.  Alan Crosland, US, 1927) (Screening format – not known, 94mins) A lavish spectacle boasting the set designs of Oscar winning art director William Cameron Menzies (The Thief of Baghdad), The Beloved Rogue is Hollywood myth-making at its most ambitious…and entertaining. Hollywood star John Barrymore sought to out-swashbuckle Douglas Fairbanks in his breathless depiction of France’s rapscallion poet, thief and vagabond: François Villon (1431-1463). To prove his mettle, he bounds over the snowy rooftops of Paris, scales a castle tower, and is hurled skyward by the royal catapult, but this is no mere stunt picture. Barrymore wielded a simmering sexuality that Fairbanks lacked, endowing the film with an element of eroticism that perfectly suits Villon, who loved “France earnestly, Frenchwomen excessively, French wine exclusively.” Beyond Barrymore, the cast is sprinkled with celebrated character actors. Fresh from a series of diabolical roles in the German silent cinema, Conrad Veidt (The Man Who Laughs, Casablanca) made his American film debut as the sinister King Louis XI. Appearing here as the scheming Thibault d’Aussigny and François’s sidekick Beppo the Dwarf, Henry Victor and Angelo Rossitto would reunite five years later in Tod Browning’s FreaksThe Beloved Rogue is a star studded action packed roller coaster which symbolises the true greatness of Hollywood in the silent era. Find out more at moviessilently.com.  Presented by South West Silents.  With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Cube Cinema, Bristol Link

Diary Of A Lost Girl (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 106mins)A masterpiece of the German silent era, Diary of a Lost Girl was the second and final collaboration of actress Louise Brooks and director G.W. Pabst a mere months after their first collaboration in the now-legendary Pandora’s Box (1929). Brooks plays Thymian Henning, a beautiful young woman raped by an unscrupulous character employed at her father’s pharmacy (played with gusto by Fritz Rasp, the degenerate villain of such Fritz Lang classics as Metropolis, Spione, and Frau im Mond). After Thymian gives birth to his child and rejects her family’s expectations of marriage, the baby is torn from her care, and Thymian enters a purgatorial reform school that seems less an institute of learning than a conduit for fulfilling the headmistress’s sadistic sexual fantasies. Find out more at rogerebert.com With live musical accompaniment by Wurlitza.  St Dominick Village Hall, St Dominick, Cornwall Link

26 February

A Couple of Down and Outs  (Walter Summers , 1923) (Screening format – not known, 64mins) Despite his distinguished war record at the Somme and Flanders, ex-Royal Horse Artillery serviceman Daniel is down on his luck on civvy street.  Turned away from yet another casual job at the docks, he comes across ex-war horses on their way to the slaughter, and amongst them his loyal battle-companion ‘Jack’. Daniel rescues his beloved horse and the pair go on the run… A charming and moving film made just a few years after the events depicted and reflecting the indignation in some quarters of both the treatment of soldiers returning from the Western Front and the fate of equine heroes being sold off fast and cheap, mistreated or slaughtered for meat.  This original ‘War Horse’ film was missing-believed-lost until its discovery and restoration in the Netherlands and at the BFI National Archive.Find out more at imdb.com .  With a recorded score by pianist John Sweeney.  This screening will be introduced by former Bafta chairman Sir Sydney Samuelson, son of the film’s producer G B Samuelson. David Lean Cinema, Croydon Link