August


 

 

 

 


1 August

The Unknown (Dir. Tod Browning, US, 1927) (Screening format – 35mm, 69 mins)  To escape the police, Alonzo, who has two thumbs on one hand, poses in a sideshow as an armless wonder. He falls in love with Estrellita, and when detected by her father, he kills him. Then, discovering that the girl abhors the touch of a man’s hand, he has both his arms amputated. Returning, he finds to his dismay that she has fallen in love with Malabar, the strong-man.  Is all lost for Alonzo….The Unknown was the sixth of ten collaborations between Chaney and director Tod Browning. Its circus theme was a favorite of Browning’s, both on and off screen.  Chaney was already “The Man of a Thousand Faces” when he appeared in The Unknown but in this film Chaney didn’t need to rely on heavy make-up to transform himself for a role. For The Unknown, Chaney reported, “I contrived to make myself look like an armless man, not simply to shock and horrify you but merely to bring to the screen a dramatic story of an armless man.”  Find out more at moviessilently.com .   With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

4 August

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  Based on two plays by the German author Frank Wedekind, Erdgeist (Earth Spirit, 1895), which Pabst himself had directed for the stage, and Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora’s Box, 1904), the silent drama follows the tumultuous life of the showgirl Lulu whose unselfconscious sexuality brings about the ruin of all those that fall for her and eventually her own.  In a daring move, Pabst chose a little known American actress over the more experienced Marlene Dietrich for the part of Lulu, a decision that made the young Louise Brooks an international star. Her innocent looks paired with her natural erotic allure and sense of movement – Brooks was also a dancer – perfectly matched Pabst’s idea of his heroine as unwitting seductress. Subjected to cuts to eliminate some of its “scandalous” content and unfavourably reviewed by critics at the time, it is now considered one of the boldest and most modern films of the Weimar era highlighting Pabst’s command of camera language and montage.  Find out more at silentlondon.co.uk .  With recorded soundtrack. The Poly, Falmouth Link

5 August

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  For film details see 5 August above.  With recorded soundtrack. Electric Cinema, Birmingham  Link

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  For film details see 5 August above.  With recorded soundtrack.  Regent Street Cinema, London Link

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  For film details see 5 August above.  With recorded soundtrack.  MAC, Birmingham Link

6 August

The Unknown (Dir. Tod Browning, US, 1927) (Screening format – 35mm, 69 mins)  To escape the police, Alonzo, who has two thumbs on one hand, poses in a sideshow as an armless wonder. He falls in love with Estrellita, and when detected by her father, he kills him. Then, discovering that the girl abhors the touch of a man’s hand, he has both his arms amputated. Returning, he finds to his dismay that she has fallen in love with Malabar, the strong-man.  Is all lost for Alonzo….The Unknown was the sixth of ten collaborations between Chaney and director Tod Browning. Its circus theme was a favorite of Browning’s, both on and off screen.  Chaney was already “The Man of a Thousand Faces” when he appeared in The Unknown but in this film Chaney didn’t need to rely on heavy make-up to transform himself for a role. For The Unknown, Chaney reported, “I contrived to make myself look like an armless man, not simply to shock and horrify you but merely to bring to the screen a dramatic story of an armless man.”  Find out more at moviessilently.com .   With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London  Link

7 August

Sherlock Jnr (Dir. Buster Keaton, 1924) + shorts (Screening format – not known, 90 mins) In Sherlock Jr, a kindly movie projectionist (Buster Keaton) longs to be a detective. When his fiancée (Kathryn McGuire) is robbed by a local thief (Ward Crane), the poor projectionist is framed for the crime. Using his amateur detective skills, the projectionist follows the thief to the train station – only to find himself locked in a train car.  Disheartened, he returns to his movie theatre, where he falls asleep and dreams that he is the great Sherlock Holmes.   Although not a popular success on its initial release, the film has come to be recognised as a Keaton classic with its special effects and elaborate stunts making it a landmark in motion picture history.  Find out more at silentfilm.org. Presented by Lucky Dog Picture House.  With world premier of live score from The Lucky Dog Cinema Band.  Wilton’s Music Hall, London Link

8 August

L’Age d’or (Dir. Luis Bunuel, Fr, 1930) (Screening format – 35mm, 63mins) More than 80 years on, this masterpiece of cinematic surrealism remains as brilliantly witty and shocking as ever. Uniting the genius of Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dali, L’Age d’Or is a uniquely savage blend of visual poetry and social commentary. A sinister yet poignant chronicle of a couple’s struggle to consummate their desire but repeatedly frustrated in their efforts by the combined forces of the church, the law and bourgeois convention – the film was banned and vilified for many years for its subversive eroticism and furious dissection of ‘civilised’ values.  Find out more at sensesofcinema.comIntroduced by BFI Programmer-at-Large Geoff Andrew.  With recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London Link

Charlie Chaplin: Short Comedies including The Immigrant (Dir, Charles Chaplin, US, 1917) and One A.M. (Dir. Charles Chaplin, US, 1916)  (Screening format – not known,   90mins) In The Immigrant, newly arrived immigrant Chaplin struggles to pay for a meal with his new found lady friend while in One A.M., Charlie Chaplin is the drunken homeowner having a difficult time getting in to his own home after arriving back late at night.  Presented by Lucky Dog Picture House.  With the world premier of LIVE score by pianist Christopher Eldred and percussionist Nicholas D. Ball of The Lucky Dog Picture House.  Wilton’s Music Hall, London Link

9 August

Safety Last (Dir. Fred C Newmeyer/Sam Taylor, US, 1923) (Screening format – not known, 73mins) A boy (Harold Lloyd) moves to New York City to make enough money to support his loving girlfriend (Mildred Davis), but soon discovers that making it in the big city is harder than it looks. When he hears that a store manager will pay $1,000 to anyone who can draw people to his store, he convinces his friend, the “human fly,” (Bill Strother) to climb the building and split the profit with him. But when his pal gets in trouble with the law, he must complete the crazy stunt on his own. The image of Harold Lloyd hanging desperately from the hands of a skyscraper clock during Safety Last!  is one of the great icons of film history (although it was achieved with a certain amount of film trickery) and this remains one of the best and best loved comedies of the silent era.  Find out more at rogerebert.com.  Presented by Lucky Dog Picture House.  With the world premier of a new live score by pianist Tom Marlow of The Lucky Dog Picture House. Wilton’s Music Hall, London  Link

10 August

Sherlock Jnr (Dir. Buster Keaton, 1924) + shorts (Screening format – not known, 90 mins) In Sherlock Jr, a kindly movie projectionist (Buster Keaton) longs to be a detective. When his fiancée (Kathryn McGuire) is robbed by a local thief (Ward Crane), the poor projectionist is framed for the crime. Using his amateur detective skills, the projectionist follows the thief to the train station – only to find himself locked in a train car.  Disheartened, he returns to his movie theatre, where he falls asleep and dreams that he is the great Sherlock Holmes.   Although not a popular success on its initial release, the film has come to be recognised as a Keaton classic with its special effects and elaborate stunts making it a landmark in motion picture history.  Find out more at silentfilm.org. Presented by Lucky Dog Picture House.  With world premier of live score from The Lucky Dog Cinema Band.  Wilton’s Music Hall, London Link

12 August

Buster Keaton Triple-Bill Funday.  Celebrate the genius of director and star Buster Keaton with a triple bill of brilliant slapstick comedy, introduced by young programmer Keaton Leigh. From an out-of-his depth student attempting to create a fully automated home in The Electric House (1922, 22min), and a man accidentally sent up in a hot air balloon in The Balloonatic (1923, 22min), to a classic case of mistaken identity in Cops (1922, 18min), Keaton’s deadpan charm and timeless invention will have you rolling in the aisles.  With live piano accompaniment.  BFI Southbank, London   Link

L’Age d’or (Dir. Luis Bunuel, Fr, 1930) (Screening format – 35mm, 63mins) More than 80 years on, this masterpiece of cinematic surrealism remains as brilliantly witty and shocking as ever. Uniting the genius of Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dali, L’Age d’Or is a uniquely savage blend of visual poetry and social commentary. A sinister yet poignant chronicle of a couple’s struggle to consummate their desire but repeatedly frustrated in their efforts by the combined forces of the church, the law and bourgeois convention – the film was banned and vilified for many years for its subversive eroticism and furious dissection of ‘civilised’ values.  Find out more at sensesofcinema.com.   With recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London Link

14 August

L’Age d’or (Dir. Luis Bunuel, Fr, 1930) (Screening format – 35mm, 63mins) More than 80 years on, this masterpiece of cinematic surrealism remains as brilliantly witty and shocking as ever. Uniting the genius of Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dali, L’Age d’Or is a uniquely savage blend of visual poetry and social commentary. A sinister yet poignant chronicle of a couple’s struggle to consummate their desire but repeatedly frustrated in their efforts by the combined forces of the church, the law and bourgeois convention – the film was banned and vilified for many years for its subversive eroticism and furious dissection of ‘civilised’ values.  Find out more at sensesofcinema.com.   With recorded score.  BFI Southbank, London Link

20 August

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  For film details see 5 August above.  With recorded soundtrack.  Saffron Screen, Saffron Waldon Link

 


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