November – December


 

 

 

November

2 November
The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, UK, 1927) + Cops (Dir. Edward F Cline/Buster Keaton, US, 1922)      (Screening format – not known, 91/18 mins ) In The Lodger, a serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the #avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org  Cops sees Buster Keaton ending up with a load of furniture in the middle of parade of policemen. An anarchist’s bomb lands in his carriage. After lighting his cigarette with it, he tosses it into the ranks of police. When it explodes the police chase him all over town by the entire Los Angeles Police Department.  Find out more at wikipedia.org .   With live musical accompaniment by acclaimed pianist Tony Judge .  Brewery Arts Centre, Kendal, Cumbria. Link

3 November

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com . With recorded James McWilliam soundtrack. Filmhouse, Edinburgh   Link

Silent Film Evening   A selection of silent films (titles TBC) with live organ accompaniment by Donald MacKenzie.  Holy Trinity Church, Southport, Lancs  Link

4 November

A Cottage on Dartmoor (Dir. Anthony Asquith, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 84mins)  Joe (Uno Henning) works as a barber in a shop in a Devon town, alongside a manicurist called Sally (Norah Baring). He becomes infatuated with her and asks her out but  it is clear that Sally does not reciprocate Joe’s feelings.  Joe’s infatuation with her develops into obsession. Meanwhile a young  farmer Harry (Hans Schlettow), begins to woo Sally and the couple begin seeing each other which leaves Joe in despair. After a fight with Harry, Joe is jailed but swears revenge on Harry and Sally.  A Cottage on Dartmoor is a tale of love and revenge set in the bleak landscape of Dartmoor and a thoughtful distillation of the best of European silent film techniques from a director steeped in the work of the Soviet avant-garde and German expressionism. One of the last films of the silent era and a virtuoso piece of film-making, A Cottage on Dartmoor was a final passionate cry in defence of an art form soon to be obsolete. Find out more at    silentfilm.org.    Introduced by Laraine Porter of De Montford University.  With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Cromarty Hall, St Margaret’s Hope, Orkney  Link

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com . With recorded James McWilliam soundtrack. Hippodrome Cinema, Bo’ness   Link

5 November

A Cottage on Dartmoor (Dir. Anthony Asquith, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 84mins)  Joe (Uno Henning) works as a barber in a shop in a Devon town, alongside a manicurist called Sally (Norah Baring). He becomes infatuated with her and asks her out but  it is clear that Sally does not reciprocate Joe’s feelings.  Joe’s infatuation with her develops into obsession. Meanwhile a young  farmer Harry (Hans Schlettow), begins to woo Sally and the couple begin seeing each other which leaves Joe in despair. After a fight with Harry, Joe is jailed but swears revenge on Harry and Sally.  A Cottage on Dartmoor is a tale of love and revenge set in the bleak landscape of Dartmoor and a thoughtful distillation of the best of European silent film techniques from a director steeped in the work of the Soviet avant-garde and German expressionism. One of the last films of the silent era and a virtuoso piece of film-making, A Cottage on Dartmoor was a final passionate cry in defence of an art form soon to be obsolete. Find out more at    silentfilm.org.    Introduced by Laraine Porter of De Montford University.  With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Gable End Theatre, Hoy, Orkney  Link

The Cameraman (Dir. Edward Sedgwick/Buster Keaton, US, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm, 67mins) Buster (Buster Keaton) meets Sally (Marceline Day), who works as a secretary for the newsreel department at MGM, and falls hard. Trying to win her attention, Buster abandons photography in order to become a news cameraman. In spite of his early failures with a motion camera, Sally takes to him as well. However, veteran cameraman Stagg (Harold Goodwin) also fancies Sally, meaning Buster will need to learn how to film quickly before he loses his job.  Find out more at slantmagazine.com .  With live piano accompaniment. BFI Southbank, London Link

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com . With recorded James McWilliam soundtrack. Eden Court, Inverness  Link

6 November

Tabu: A Story of the South Seas (Dir. F  Murnau, US, 1931) (Screening format – not known, 84mins) F.W. Murnau’s last silent film, the poetic and moving Tabu is the story of an impossible love on Bora-Bora island, between Matahi, a young pearl diver, and Reri, a young woman promised to the gods.  One of the last classic silent movies, this supreme example of poetic cinema brought together the German expressionist Murnau with the American mining engineer turned ethnographic documentary film-maker Robert J Flaherty.  With studio money they escaped to spend a year around Tahiti making their film, recruiting non-professional talent locally and producing a film with no inter-titles (the story is told by sign, gesture an documents) and one that is beautiful to behold, winning an Oscar for cinematography.  Tragically, Murnau was killed in a car accident just a week before the film’s premier. Find out more at imdb.com.  Presented as part of the Leeds International Film Festival. Accompanied live  by acclaimed French musician Christine Otton.  Town Hall, Leeds. Link

Such Is Life (Dir. Carl Junghans, 1930) (Screening format – not known,  71mins)  This Czech film captures the tragic story of an aging laundress (Vera Baranovskaja) whose drudgery and toil support a licentious and abusive alcoholic husband (Theodor Pištěk). A psychological drama with social themes, it draws from Zola’s novel, The Kill, and with full cinematic expression, a progressive approach to montage and emphasis on the symbolic power of close-ups, represents the climax of silent film.  Find out more at wikipedia.org .  Presented as part of the Leeds International Film Festival. Accompanied by a live performance on piano from Jonathan Best.  Hyde Park Picture House, Leeds Link

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – DCP, 96mins) A German Expressionis horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational masterwork of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  .  With recorded soundtrack. BFI Southbank, London Link

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com . With recorded James McWilliam soundtrack. SARIC, Syston, Leicestershire Link

The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1927) (Screening format – not known ) A serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the #avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org  With live organ accompaniment by Darius Battiwalla.  Leeds Town Hall, Leeds  Link

7 November

The Cameraman (Dir. Edward Sedgwick/Buster Keaton, US, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm, 67mins) Buster (Buster Keaton) meets Sally (Marceline Day), who works as a secretary for the newsreel department at MGM, and falls hard. Trying to win her attention, Buster abandons photography in order to become a news cameraman. In spite of his early failures with a motion camera, Sally takes to him as well. However, veteran cameraman Stagg (Harold Goodwin) also fancies Sally, meaning Buster will need to learn how to film quickly before he loses his job.  Find out more at slantmagazine.com .  With live piano accompaniment. BFI Southbank, London Link

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 81mins) A German Expressionis horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational masterwork of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  .  With live musical accompaniment from Dmytro Morykit.  Halton Mill, Lancaster Link

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com . With recorded James McWilliam soundtrack. Bewdley Film Club, Worcestershire Link

8 November

Last of the Mohicans (Dir. Maurice Tourneur/Clarence Brown, US, 1920) (Screening format – not known, 73mins)   This is the second film adaption of James Fenimore Cooper’s classic adventure novel,  the story of two English sisters (Barbara Bedford and Lillian Hall) meeting danger on the frontier of the American colonies, in and around the fort commanded by their father.  Help comes in the form of hunter and scout Hawkeye (Harry Lorraine) together with  Chingachgook (Theodore Lorch) and his son Uncas (Alan Roscoe), the last of the Mohicans.  Wallace Beery is suitably menacing as the evil Magua.  Oh, and look out for Boris Karloff in an uncredited bit-part as an Indian. Find out more at  imdb.com .  Presented by the Kennington Bioscope.  With live piano accompaniment.    Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London. Link

9 November

Tuvalu (Dir. Veit Helmer, Ger, 1999) Screening format – not known, 101 mins) A modern soundtrack for a modern silent film – Veit Helmer’s gorgeous Tuvalu ranks alongside the Oscar-winning The Artist as one of the greatest silent films made in recent years. Why choose between a gig or a film when you can have both? No piano solo accompaniment here: silent film is going to get loud.  All attendees can be a part of the score using their mobile phones, with interactive elements cueing you to cheer, stamp, boo and even gargle as hero Anton sets out to save his beloved swimming pool from closure, and win the heart of feisty Eva in this quirky silent fairy tale.  This will be only the second time the live soundtrack has been performed in the world, with the world premiere taking place at the 20th Motovun Film Festival in Croatia in July 2017. Previously unreleased in the UK, Tuvalu is a must-see for fans of classic silent films, as well as fans of alternative indie live music think Arcade Fire, British Sea Power, or Sigur Ros. Find out more at imdb.com  Presented as part of Hull City of Culture 2017.  With live musical accompaniment by Croatia’s leading indie electro artists Mr Lee & IvaneSky. Fruit, Hull  Link

  Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – DCP, 96mins) A German Expressionis horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational masterwork of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  .  With recorded soundtrack. BFI Southbank, London Link

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com . With recorded James McWilliam soundtrack. The Egerton Film Society, Kent Link

10 November

By the Law (Po Zakonu)   (Dir . Lev Kuleshov, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 80mins )    Legendary director Lev Kuleshov adapted a short story by Jack London, fashioning a tense, existential study of moral pressure…in effect a pared-back Soviet Western.    Three gold prospectors are holed up in a cabin – one driven to murder by greed, the other two wrestling with whether to wait for the snow and ice to thaw and go for the authorities or to take the Law into their own hands.  The stage is set for a claustrophobic drama of raw power, combining naturalism and the grotesque, realism and melodrama…   Find out more at silentsaregolden.com . With live musical accompaniment by multi-award-winning Scottish musician, singer and song-writer R.M. Hubbert (aka Hubby) performing his brand new guitar score, commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival.  Venue TBC, Dunoon  Link

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 81mins) A German Expressionis horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational masterwork of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  .  With live musical accompaniment from Dmytro Morykit.  The Heron, Beetham, Cumbria Link

Battleship Potemkin (Dir. Sergei Eisenstein, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 75mins) Considered one of the most important films in the history of silent pictures, as well as possibly Eisenstein’s greatest work, Battleship Potemkin brought Eisenstein’s theories of cinema art to the world in a powerful showcase; his emphasis on montage, his stress of intellectual contact, and his treatment of the mass instead of the individual as the protagonist. The film tells the story of the mutiny on the Russian ship Prince Potemkin during the 1905 uprising.Their mutiny was short-lived, however, as during their attempts to get the population of Odessa to join the uprising, soldiers arrived and laid waste to the insurgents.  Battleship Potemkin is a work of extraordinary pictorial beauty and great elegance of form. It is symmetrically broken into five movements or acts. In the first of these, “Men and Maggots,” the flagrant mistreatment of the sailors at the hands of their officers is demonstrated, while the second, “Drama on the Quarterdeck,” presents the actual mutiny and the ship’s arrival in Odessa. “Appeal from the Dead” establishes the solidarity of the citizens of Odessa with the mutineers. It is the fourth sequence, “The Odessa Steps,” which depicts the massacre of the citizens, that thrust Eisenstein and his film into the historical eminence that both occupy today. It is unquestionably the most famous sequence of its kind in film history, and Eisenstein displays his legendary ability to convey large-scale action scenes. The shot of the baby carriage tumbling down the long staircase has been re-created in many films. The sequence’s power is such that the film’s conclusion, “Meeting the Squadron,” in which the Potemkin in a show of brotherhood is allowed to pass through the squadron unharmed, is anticlimactic.  Find out more at classicartfilms.com .  With live musical accompaniment by Jonny Best (piano) and Trevor Bartlett (percussion).  Rymer Auditorium, University of York, York Link

 11 November
Flying Luck (Dir. Herman C Raymaker, US, 1927) (Screening format – not known, 71 mins) Inspired by his hero, aviator Charles Lindbergh, our boy (Monty Banks)   buys a dilapidated airplane, rebuilds it, and studies flying in “Ten Easy Lessons by Mail.” When his first flight crashes through the roof of an Army recruiting office he’s inspired to enlist. Further chaos and confusion ensues but will it enough to prevent Monty winning over the Colonel’s daughter (Jean Arthur).  Find out more at imdb.com .   Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope’s Silent Laughter Saturday.  Introduced by Matthew Ross.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London  Link
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The Battle of the Ancre and the Advance of the Tanks (Dir. Geoffrey Malins, UK, 1917) (Screening format – not known, 67mins)  The Battle of the Ancre is the official record of the British Army’s winter campaign on the Somme in 1916. Ancre contains evocative and haunting images of trench warfare, notably of the waves of troops advancing into no-man’s land, the use of horses and the first views of the tank – the secret weapon used to break the deadlock on the Western Front.  Find out more at  imdb.com .  Presented as part of the Aesthetica Film Festival.  With recorded soundtrack.  1331 Cafe, York   Link

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 81mins) A German Expressionis horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational masterwork of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  .  With live musical accompaniment from Dmytro Morykit.  The Heron, Beetham, Cumbria Link

Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1927) (Screening format –not known , 149 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored so that at last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at silentfilm.org .  Presented as part of the Cinecity Brighton Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment from electronic improv group Factory Floor.    Attenborough Centre for Creative Arts, Brighton  Link

Blackmail (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 84mins) Alice White is the daughter of a shopkeeper in 1920’s London. Her boyfriend, Frank Webber is a Scotland Yard detective who seems more interested in police work than in her. Frank takes Alice out one night, but she has secretly arranged to meet another man. Later that night Alice agrees to go back to his flat to see his studio. The man has other ideas and as he tries to rape Alice, she defends herself and kills him with a bread knife. When the body is discovered, Frank is assigned to the case, he quickly determines that Alice is the killer, but so has someone else and blackmail is threatened. Alfred Hitchcock’s sinister, suspenseful tale of crime and romance is one of the last British silent films to be made. With his traditional cameo appearance in the first reel, to a spectacular moonlit chase through the British Museum in the final reel, Blackmail is a classic thriller from the Master of Suspense.  Find out more at screenonline.org.uk    With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Hippodrome Cinema, Bo’Ness, Scotland Link

A Cottage on Dartmoor (Dir. Anthony Asquith, 1929) (Screening format – BluRay, 84mins)  Joe (Uno Henning) works as a barber in a shop in a Devon town, alongside a manicurist called Sally (Norah Baring). He becomes infatuated with her and asks her out but  it is clear that Sally does not reciprocate Joe’s feelings.  Joe’s infatuation with her develops into obsession. Meanwhile a young  farmer Harry (Hans Schlettow), begins to woo Sally and the couple begin seeing each other which leaves Joe in despair. After a fight with Harry, Joe is jailed but swears revenge on Harry and Sally.  A Cottage on Dartmoor is a tale of love and revenge set in the bleak landscape of Dartmoor and a thoughtful distillation of the best of European silent film techniques from a director steeped in the work of the Soviet avant-garde and German expressionism. One of the last films of the silent era and a virtuoso piece of film-making, A Cottage on Dartmoor was a final passionate cry in defence of an art form soon to be obsolete. Find out more at    silentfilm.org.    With live musical accompaniment by Wurlitza.  Newnham Film Club, Newnham, Cornwall   Link

Dawson City – Frozen Time (Dir. Bill Morrison, US, 2016) This documentary pieces together the bizarre true story of a collection of some 500 films dating from 1910s – 1920s, which were lost for over 50 years until discovered buried in a sub-arctic swimming pool deep in the Yukon Territory, in Dawson City, located about 350 miles south of the Arctic Circle. Using these permafrost protected, rare silent films and newsreels, archival footage, interviews and historical photographs to tell the story, and accompanied by an enigmatic score by Sigur Rós collaborator and composer Alex Somers (Captain Fantastic), Dawson City: Frozen Time depicts a unique history of a Canadian gold rush town by chronicling the life cycle of a singular film collection through its exile, burial, rediscovery, and salvation – and through that collection, how a First Nation hunting camp was transformed and displaced. Find out more at picturepalacepictures.com  .   Presented as part of the Inverness Film Festival. Eden Court, Inverness    Link

British ShortsA selection of early British shorts with several featuring the early Vivaphone sound system. Films include; I Do Like to Be Where the Girls Are (Vivaphone)(c.1912); The Curate and His Double (aka The Parson and His Double) (1907); Kelly Takes His Missus to Southend (aka A Useful Umbrella) (1913); A Merry Night (1914); Walter Makes A Movie (1922) with Walter Forde (image left); and finally The Rollicking Rajah (Vivaphone)(c.1912, image above right).  Presented as part of the Kennngton Bioscope Silent Laughter Saturday.  Introduced by Tony Fletcher.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London  Link
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Hapless Husbands A selection of silent films featuring that put-upon breed.  Films include ;  Robinet is Jealous (1914) one of the series of Robinet shorts featuring Marcel Perez; Innocent Husbands (1925) with Charley Chase, married to a jealous wife but discovering an unconscious woman in his house; Max Wants A Divorce (1917) with Max Linder forced to choose between losing his newly-wedded wife and a fortune; and lastly The Persian Carpet (1919) with Gerhard Dammann.    Presented as part of the Kennngton Bioscope Silent Laughter Saturday.  Introduced by Michelle Facey.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London  Link
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Be My Wife (Dir. Max Linder, US, 1921) (Screening format – not known, 57mins) Max (Max Linder) and Mary (Alta Allen) are in love, but Mary’s Aunt Agatha (Caroline Rankin) dislikes Max, and instead prefers the unappealing Simon . So Max has to resort to a series of ruses to try to get Simon out of the way, and to be able to spend time with Mary. Finally, Max comes up with a scheme that might allow him to prove to Aunt Agatha that he is more worthy than Simon.  Find out more at imdb.com  .   Presented as part of the Kennngton Bioscope Silent Laughter Saturday.  Introduced by Jon Davies.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London  Link
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Keaton Centenary –Illustrated talk with films and clips to mark the hundredth anniversary of Buster Keaton’s first appearance on film.  Presented as part of the Kennngton Bioscope Silent Laughter Saturday.  Introduced by David Wyatt and Susan Cygan.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, LondonLink
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She Could Be Chaplin!An illustrated talk on the life and career of  now almost forgotten comedienne Alice Howell including shorts Cinderella Cinders (Dir. Frederick J Ireland, US, 1920) and One Wet Night (Dir. William Watson, 1924). Presented as part of the Kennngton Bioscope Silent Laughter Saturday.  Introduced by Anthony Slide (who will be signing copies of his new book on Alice Howell).   With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, LondonLink
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Neptunes’s Naughty Daughter (Dir. John G Blystone,US, 1917)(Screening format – not known)    Recently rediscovered at the EYE Filmmuseum in Amsterdam, virtually nothing is known of this film.  This is the premier of a new restoration. Presented as part of the Kennngton Bioscope Silent Laughter Saturday.  Introduced by Anthony Slide (who will be signing copies of his new book on Alice Howell).   With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London    Link
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The Kid Brother ( Dir. Harold Lloyd/ Ted Wilde. US, 1927) (Screening format – not known, 82 mins) The most important family in Hickoryville is the Hickorys, with sheriff Jim and his tough manly sons Leo and Olin. The timid youngest son, Harold, (Harold Lloyd) doesn’t have the muscles to match up to them, so he has to use his wits to win the respect of his strong father and also the love of beautiful Mary (Jobyna Ralston).  Find out more at  silentfilm.org .    Presented as part of the Kennngton Bioscope Silent Laughter Saturday.  Introduced by Kevin Brownlow.    With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London    Link
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12 November

The Woman He Scorned (aka The Way Of Lost Souls) (Dir. Paul Czinner, UK, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 94 mins)  Considered washed up in Hollywood, silent-screen queen Pola Negri made her talkie debut in the British The Woman He Scorned. The plot concerns a lighthouse keeper (Warwick Ward) who  finds himself in a nightclub where woman-of-the-world (Louise) Pola Negri attaches herself to him. He wants no part of her and sets out to sea alone, back to his lonely lighthouse. But fate has a lot more in store for the poor lighthouse keeper.  Find out more at imdb.com.  Presented as part of the Inverness Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Eden Court, Inverness Link

The Last Silent Picture ShowTurmoil hit the British film industry in 1929. Sound technology was making inroads in film studios and cinemas but where did that leave the silent features already planned or completed? Using extensive clips, film historian Geoff Brown explores the mixed artistic results of the industry’s heroic, sometimes foolhardy attempts to remodel existing silent properties with synchronised dialogue and music. The young Alfred Hitchcock achieved a triumph in Blackmail, but what about the sentimental drama Kitty, the tartan nightmare of The Lady of the Lake, or the earnestly Germanic The Informer? And would the exotic Mona Goya in The Lady from the Sea manage to pronounce the word “bungalow”?  Presented as part of the Inverness Silent Film Festival.  Eden Court, Inverness Link

Together (Dir. Lorenza Mazzetti,  1956) (Screening format – DCP, 52mins)  A special screening of this dialogue-free film made without synchronised sound by pioneering, Italian-born Lorenza Mazzetti, part of the British ‘Free Cinema’ movement, whose manifesto celebrated ‘freedom’ for filmmakers from orthodoxy and conservatism. The film is a refreshing and sometimes moving slice of everyday working-class life, set in London’s East End.  It follows two deaf-mute dockers in the midst of the wary, hearing community.  Mazzetti cast the then unknown, 32-year-old Scottish artist Eduardo Paolozzi in the lead. He relished his role, modelling his performance on Marlon Brando!  Find out more at imdb.com .  Presented as part of the EFG London Jazz Festival.  With live jazz accompaniment from by Raymond MacDonald and Christian Ferlaino (saxophone & percussion).  Barbican, London Link

The Battle of the Ancre and the Advance of the Tanks (Dir. Geoffrey Malins, UK, 1917) (Screening format – not known, 67mins)  The Battle of the Ancre is the official record of the British Army’s winter campaign on the Somme in 1916. Ancre contains evocative and haunting images of trench warfare, notably of the waves of troops advancing into no-man’s land, the use of horses and the first views of the tank – the secret weapon used to break the deadlock on the Western Front.  Find out more at  imdb.com .  Presented as part of the Aesthetica Film Festival.  With recorded soundtrack.  1331 Cafe, York   Link

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – DCP, 96mins) A German Expressionis horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational masterwork of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  .  With recorded soundtrack. BFI Southbank, London Link

By the Law (Po Zakonu)   (Dir . Lev Kuleshov, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 80mins )    Legendary director Lev Kuleshov adapted a short story by Jack London, fashioning a tense, existential study of moral pressure…in effect a pared-back Soviet Western.    Three gold prospectors are holed up in a cabin – one driven to murder by greed, the other two wrestling with whether to wait for the snow and ice to thaw and go for the authorities or to take the Law into their own hands.  The stage is set for a claustrophobic drama of raw power, combining naturalism and the grotesque, realism and melodrama…   Find out more at silentsaregolden.com . With live musical accompaniment by multi-award-winning Scottish musician, singer and song-writer R.M. Hubbert (aka Hubby) performing his brand new guitar score, commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival.  Dreel Hall, Anstruther, Scotland  Link

15 November

Weimar Silent Film Night Between 1919 and 1933 the Weimar Republic had an enormous influence on international perceptions of German film. This first German democratic state, which at the end of the First World War succeeded the imperial regime of Kaiser Wilhelm II, enabled film to emerge as a socially significant art form both despite and because of economic, political, and civil crises. Presented by South West Silents.   Introduced by Yorkshire Silents’ Jonathan Best who will provide live piano accompaniment to the films.  Lansdown Public House, Clifton, Bristol  Link

16 November

The Navigator (Dir. Donald Crisp/Buster Keaton, US, 1924) (Screening format – not known, 59mins)  When  the wealthy and impulsive Rollo Treadway (Buster Keaton) decides to propose to his beautiful socialite neighbor, Betsy O’Brien (Kathryn McGuire), things don’t go as planned. Alhough Betsy turns Rollo down, he still opts go on the cruise that he intended as their honeymoon. When circumstances find both Rollo and Betsy on the wrong ship, with no one else on board, they end up with some hilarious high adventures on the high seas, which allows Keaton plenty of opportunities to display his trademark agility. Find out more at busterkeaton.com .  With live organ accompaniment from Donald MacKenzie.  Alexandra Palace, London  Link

17 November

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com .  Accompanied by an original musical composition by James McWilliam performed by the Covent Garden Sinfonia under the baton of Artistic Director Ben Palmer.  Langley Park Centre for the Performing Arts, Beckenham  Link

18 November

Dr. Mabuse, The Gambler (Dir. Fritz Lang, Ger, 1922) (Screening format – DCP, 270mins) Lang’s epic but fast-moving two-parter, about an all-powerful underworld genius and master of disguise creating all kinds of chaos in Berlin, is one of the earliest and greatest conspiracy thrillers. Mabuse is focused on manipulating the economy in his quest for power, as made clear in the opening scenes, which convey the frighteningly wide range of his malign influence. A visionary classic. Find out more at  tcm.com .  With recorded Aljoscha Zimmermann score.  BFI Southbank, London     Link

Silent Film Evening   A selection of silent films (titles TBC) with live organ accompaniment by Donald MacKenzie.  Victoria Hall, Hanley, Stoke on Trent   Link

19 November

Sins Of Love (Dir. Karel Lamac, Czech, 1929) (Screening format – Not known, 70mins) The dramatic story of a rural actor whose life is destroyed by a theatre engagement in the big city, and by his obsessive love for his beautiful, much younger wife. When Ivan and Sonia leave the countryside for the city, she becomes a star and takes a lover; so begins a spiral of events that lead to tragedy. Beautifully directed by leading European actor and filmmaker Karel Lamač (who shot newsreels during World War I and with the RAF during the Second World War), The Sins of Love has been restored by the National Film Archive in Prague, and receives its long overdue premiere in the UK.  Find out more at kviff.com.  With live musical accompaniment.  Barbican, London  Link

  Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – 35mm known, 135mins)  Based on two plays by the German author Frank Wedekind, Erdgeist (Earth Spirit, 1895), which Pabst himself had directed for the stage, and Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora’s Box, 1904), the silent drama follows the tumultuous life of the showgirl Lulu whose unselfconscious sexuality brings about the ruin of all those that fall for her and eventually her own.  In a daring move, Pabst chose a little known American actress over the more experienced Marlene Dietrich for the part of Lulu, a decision that made the young Louise Brooks an international star. Her innocent looks paired with her natural erotic allure and sense of movement – Brooks was also a dancer – perfectly matched Pabst’s idea of his heroine as unwitting seductress. Subjected to cuts to eliminate some of its “scandalous” content and unfavourably reviewed by critics at the time, it is now considered one of the boldest and most modern films of the Weimar era highlighting Pabst’s command of camera language and montage.  Find out more at silentlondon.co.uk .  With live piano accompaniment and an introduction by Silent London’s Pamela Hutchinson, author of a forthcoming BFI Film Classics book on Pandora’s Box. BFI Southbank, London Link

Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1927) (Screening format –not known , 149 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored so that at last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at silentfilm.org .  With recorded soundtrack.  Neuadd Dwyfor, Pwllheli  Link

21 November

Man With a Movie Camera (Dir. Dziga Vertov, USSR, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 68mins) Part documentary and part cinematic art, this film follows a city in the 1920s Soviet Union throughout the day, from morning to night. Directed by Vertov, with a variety of complex and innovative camera shots (filmed by Vertov’s equally talented and innovative brother Mikhail Kaufman), the film depicts scenes of ordinary daily life in Russia. Vertov celebrates the modernity of the city, with its vast buildings, dense population and bustling industries. While there are no titles or narration, director and cameraman still naturally convey the marvels of the modern city.  Find out more at rogerebert.com .  With live musical accompaniment by Jonny Best (piano), Susie Green (electronics) and Trevor Bartlett (marimba and percussion).  Truck Theatre, Hull Link

Battleship Potemkin (Dir. Sergei Eisenstein, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 75mins) Considered one of the most important films in the history of silent pictures, as well as possibly Eisenstein’s greatest work, Battleship Potemkin brought Eisenstein’s theories of cinema art to the world in a powerful showcase; his emphasis on montage, his stress of intellectual contact, and his treatment of the mass instead of the individual as the protagonist. The film tells the story of the mutiny on the Russian ship Prince Potemkin during the 1905 uprising.Their mutiny was short-lived, however, as during their attempts to get the population of Odessa to join the uprising, soldiers arrived and laid waste to the insurgents.  Battleship Potemkin is a work of extraordinary pictorial beauty and great elegance of form. It is symmetrically broken into five movements or acts. In the first of these, “Men and Maggots,” the flagrant mistreatment of the sailors at the hands of their officers is demonstrated, while the second, “Drama on the Quarterdeck,” presents the actual mutiny and the ship’s arrival in Odessa. “Appeal from the Dead” establishes the solidarity of the citizens of Odessa with the mutineers. It is the fourth sequence, “The Odessa Steps,” which depicts the massacre of the citizens, that thrust Eisenstein and his film into the historical eminence that both occupy today. It is unquestionably the most famous sequence of its kind in film history, and Eisenstein displays his legendary ability to convey large-scale action scenes. The shot of the baby carriage tumbling down the long staircase has been re-created in many films. The sequence’s power is such that the film’s conclusion, “Meeting the Squadron,”  is almost anticlimactic.  Find out more at classicartfilms.com . With live musical accompaniment by Jonny Best (piano), Susie Green (electronics) and Trevor Bartlett (marimba and percussion).  Truck Theatre, Hull Link
23 November

Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1927) (Screening format –not known , 149 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored so that at last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at silentfilm.org .  With recorded soundtrack.  Artrix Arts Centre, Bromsgrove  Link

  24 November

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – 35mm, 135mins)  Based on two plays by the German author Frank Wedekind, Erdgeist (Earth Spirit, 1895), which Pabst himself had directed for the stage, and Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora’s Box, 1904), the silent drama follows the tumultuous life of the showgirl Lulu whose unselfconscious sexuality brings about the ruin of all those that fall for her and eventually her own.  In a daring move, Pabst chose a little known American actress over the more experienced Marlene Dietrich for the part of Lulu, a decision that made the young Louise Brooks an international star. Her innocent looks paired with her natural erotic allure and sense of movement – Brooks was also a dancer – perfectly matched Pabst’s idea of his heroine as unwitting seductress. Subjected to cuts to eliminate some of its “scandalous” content and unfavourably reviewed by critics at the time, it is now considered one of the boldest and most modern films of the Weimar era highlighting Pabst’s command of camera language and montage.  Find out more at silentlondon.co.uk .  Presented by South West Silents.  With live piano accompaniment by John Sweeney and an introduction by Silent London’s Pamela Hutchinson, author of a forthcoming BFI Film Classics book on Pandora’s Box. Cube Cinema, Bristol  Link

Peter Pan (Dir. Herbert Brenon, US, 1924)  (Screening format – not known, 105mins)  J M Barrie’s famous story of Peter Pan, a magical boy who refuses to grow up, brings the Darling children (Wendy, John, and Michael) from London to  Neverland where they have adventures that include a confrontation with the pirate Captain Hook and his crew.  Betty Bronson was personally selected by Barrie to play Petr Pan in a film that is an awful lot darker than the Disney version.  Find out more at imdb.com .  With live organ accompaniment by Donald Mackenzie.  Caird Hall, Dundee   Link

26 November

 The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, UK, 1927)      (Screening format – not known, 91 mins ) A serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the #avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org  . Presented as part of the Cinecity Brighton Film Festival.  With a brand-new score composed by Neil Brand and performed live by the 12-piece Covent Garden Sinfonia conducted by Ben Palmer.  Duke of York’s Picture House, Brighton  Link.

Man With A Movie Camera (Dir. Dziga Vertov, USSR, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 68mins)  “An experiment in the creative communication of visible events without the aid of inter-titles, a scenario or theatre “aiming at creating a truly international absolute language of cinema,” is how the inter-titles describe what is about to be seen. Bold claims indeed, but in its awesome sophistication The Man with a Movie Camera does live up to them, making it one of the most contemporary of silent movies. The subject, the life of a city from dawn to dusk, was not original even for 1928, but its treatment was–the cameraman as voyeur, social commentator and prankster, exploiting every trick permissible with the technology of the day (slow motion, dissolves, split screens, freeze frames, stop motion animation, etc). A young woman stirs in her bed, apparently fighting a nightmare in which a cameraman is about to be crushed by an oncoming train. She wakes up, and the sequence is revealed to be a simple trick shot. As she blinks her weary eyes, the shutters of her window mimic her viewpoint, and the iris of the camera spins open. Self-reflexive wit like this abounds here–there’s even a delicious counterpoint made between the splicing of film and the painting of a woman’s nails.  Find out more at  openculture.com .  With recorded soundtrack.  BFI Southbank, London Link

Dr. Mabuse, The Gambler (Dir. Fritz Lang, Ger, 1922) (Screening format – DCP, 270mins) Lang’s epic but fast-moving two-parter, about an all-powerful underworld genius and master of disguise creating all kinds of chaos in Berlin, is one of the earliest and greatest conspiracy thrillers. Mabuse is focused on manipulating the economy in his quest for power, as made clear in the opening scenes, which convey the frighteningly wide range of his malign influence. A visionary classic. Find out more at  tcm.com .  With recorded Aljoscha Zimmermann score.  BFI Southbank, London     Link

Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1927) (Screening format –not known , 149 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored so that at last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at silentfilm.org .  With recorded soundtrack. Curzon, Clevedon  Link

30 November

Phantom Of The Opera (Dir. Rupert Julian, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 103mins)  A title that needs no introduction, The Phantom of the Opera has spawned many remakes, remasters and sequels. This original film version, produced with moments of early Technicolour, sees Lon Chaney, the ‘Man of a Thousand Faces’ perform one of his most iconic roles. His ghastly make-up and outrageous performance made this title a benchmark in the American silent film era. The film was a critical and commercial success upon release, and still stands as an important film in cinematic history to this day, with press quotes from the time labelling the film an ‘ultra-fantastic melodrama’ (New York Times), ‘produced on a stupendous scale’ (Moving Picture World) and ‘probably the greatest inducement to nightmare that has yet been screened’ (Variety).  The mysterious phantom (Lon Chaney) is a vengeful composer living in the catacombs under the Paris Opera House, determined to promote the career of  the singer he loves (Mary Philbin).  Famed for the phantom’s shock unmasking, incredible set designs and the masked ball sequence, it still packs a punch. Find out more at wikipedia.org. With live organ accompaniment by Darius Battiwalla.  Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester  Link

December

2 December

Battleship Potemkin (Dir. Sergei Eisenstein, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 75mins) Considered one of the most important films in the history of silent pictures, as well as possibly Eisenstein’s greatest work, Battleship Potemkin brought Eisenstein’s theories of cinema art to the world in a powerful showcase; his emphasis on montage, his stress of intellectual contact, and his treatment of the mass instead of the individual as the protagonist. The film tells the story of the mutiny on the Russian ship Prince Potemkin during the 1905 uprising.Their mutiny was short-lived, however, as during their attempts to get the population of Odessa to join the uprising, soldiers arrived and laid waste to the insurgents.  Battleship Potemkin is a work of extraordinary pictorial beauty and great elegance of form. It is symmetrically broken into five movements or acts. In the first of these, “Men and Maggots,” the flagrant mistreatment of the sailors at the hands of their officers is demonstrated, while the second, “Drama on the Quarterdeck,” presents the actual mutiny and the ship’s arrival in Odessa. “Appeal from the Dead” establishes the solidarity of the citizens of Odessa with the mutineers. It is the fourth sequence, “The Odessa Steps,” which depicts the massacre of the citizens, that thrust Eisenstein and his film into the historical eminence that both occupy today. It is unquestionably the most famous sequence of its kind in film history, and Eisenstein displays his legendary ability to convey large-scale action scenes. The shot of the baby carriage tumbling down the long staircase has been re-created in many films. The sequence’s power is such that the film’s conclusion, “Meeting the Squadron,” in which the Potemkin in a show of brotherhood is allowed to pass through the squadron unharmed, is anticlimactic.  Find out more at classicartfilms.com .  With live musical accompaniment by Darius Battiwalla.  Hebden Bridge Picture House, Hebden Bridge, Yorks Link

3 December

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  Based on two plays by the German author Frank Wedekind, Erdgeist (Earth Spirit, 1895), which Pabst himself had directed for the stage, and Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora’s Box, 1904), the silent drama follows the tumultuous life of the showgirl Lulu whose unselfconscious sexuality brings about the ruin of all those that fall for her and eventually her own.  In a daring move, Pabst chose a little known American actress over the more experienced Marlene Dietrich for the part of Lulu, a decision that made the young Louise Brooks an international star. Her innocent looks paired with her natural erotic allure and sense of movement – Brooks was also a dancer – perfectly matched Pabst’s idea of his heroine as unwitting seductress. Subjected to cuts to eliminate some of its “scandalous” content and unfavourably reviewed by critics at the time, it is now considered one of the boldest and most modern films of the Weimar era highlighting Pabst’s command of camera language and montage.  Find out more at silentlondon.co.uk .  With live piano accompaniment by Stephen Horne and an introduction by Silent London’s Pamela Hutchinson, author of a forthcoming BFI Film Classics book on Pandora’s Box. Phoenix Cinema, Finchley, London.   Link

By the Law (Po Zakonu)   (Dir . Lev Kuleshov, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 80mins )    Legendary director Lev Kuleshov adapted a short story by Jack London, fashioning a tense, existential study of moral pressure…in effect a pared-back Soviet Western.    Three gold prospectors are holed up in a cabin – one driven to murder by greed, the other two wrestling with whether to wait for the snow and ice to thaw and go for the authorities or to take the Law into their own hands.  The stage is set for a claustrophobic drama of raw power, combining naturalism and the grotesque, realism and melodrama…   Find out more at silentsaregolden.com . With live musical accompaniment by multi-award-winning Scottish musician, singer and song-writer R.M. Hubbert (aka Hubby) performing his brand new guitar score, commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival.  Filmhouse, Edinburgh  Link

5 December

A Story of Floating Weeds ( Ukikusa monogatari) (Dir. Yasujiro Ozu, Jap, 1934) (Screening format – not known, 86 mins)  An itinerant kabuki troupe, led by aging actor Kihachi, arrives in a small town. He frequents the local cafe owner, who is an old flame, and with whom he fathered a son, Shinkinchi, who remains ignorant as to who his father is. Kihachi’s jealous mistress, Otaka, pays a young actress in the troupe to seduce Shinkichi, but the young pair fall in love. But events are not destined to run smoothly.  The film was remade by Ozu in 1959, called simply Floating Weeds. Find out more at tcm.com .  With recorded soundtrack.  Sands Film Club, Rotherhithe, London   Link

6 December

Pavement Buttefly (Dir.  Richard Eichberg, Ger/UK, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 90mins) In Paris, beautiful Chinese dancer Mah (Anna May Wong) is on the run from the brutal clown Coco (Alexander Granach).  She finds refuge with an immigrant Russian painter Kusmin (Fred Louis Lerch), becoming his muse.  But Coco is not done with Mah yet and tragedy  looms.  Find out more at imdb.com .   A presentation by the Kennington Bioscope. With live musical accompaniment.   Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London. Link

11 Decmber

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com . With recorded James McWilliam soundtrack. Andover Film Club, Hampshire Link

17 Decmber

London Symphony (Dir.  Alex Barrett, UK, 2017) (Screening format – not known)  London Symphony  is a brand new silent film – a city symphony – which offers a poetic journey through London, a cosmopolitan city facing a challenge to its identity in the current political climate.  It is an artistic portrait of the city as it stands today, and a celebration of its culture and diversity. Find out more at londonsymphfilm.com . With recorded James McWilliam soundtrack. HOME, Manchester Link

20 December

Miss Bluebeard (Dir. Frank Tuttle, US, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 62 mins) In order to escape the demands of his female admirers, Larry Charters (Robert Frazer) , a writer of popular songs, arranges to have his friend Bob Hawley (Kenneth MacKenna) impersonate him. Traveling on the Continent, Bob meets a French actress, Colette (Bebe Daniels), and when the two are accidentally married by a tipsy  mayor the confusion is just about to start.   Find out more at  imdb.com   A presentation by the Kennington Bioscope.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London. Link

The Cameraman (Dir. Edward Sedgwick/Buster Keaton, US, 1928) + Christmas shorts.  (Screening format – not known, 67mins) Buster (Buster Keaton) meets Sally (Marceline Day), who works as a secretary for the newsreel department at MGM, and falls hard. Trying to win her attention, Buster abandons photography in order to become a news cameraman. In spite of his early failures with a motion camera, Sally takes to him as well. However, veteran cameraman Stagg (Harold Goodwin) also fancies Sally, meaning Buster will need to learn how to film quickly before he loses his job.  Find out more at slantmagazine.com .  With live piano accompaniment from John Sweeney.   St John’s Church, Wolverhampton   Link

21 December

Laurel & Hardy – Silent Magic including  Two Tars (Dir. James Parrot, 1928) + You’re Darn Tooting (Dir. E L Kennedy, 1928) + Putting Pants on Philip (Dir. Clyde Bruckman, 1927) + Big Business (James W Hormer/Leo McCarey, 1929)  (Screening format – not known, 21/20/19/19 mins)  Two Tars sees L&H as sailors on leave, who pick up two girls and spend the afternoon driving in the country. But when they find themselves in the middle of a huge traffic jam tempers boil over and soon the street is a mess of mangled cars and car parts.    In You’re Darn Tooting L&H are sacked from their orchestral jobs so they try their luck at being street musicians, but the tiffs they get into with each other soon spread to passers by in general, until the street is filled with men pulling each other’s pants off.  In Putting Pants on Philip, Stan is a sex-mad Scot newly arrived in America while Ollie plays his uncle, desperate to get him out of a kilt and into some trousers. In Big Business L&H are selling christmas trees in mid-summer.  When customer James Finlayson doesn’t want to buy mayhem ensues.  With live organ accompaniment by Donald McKenzie.  Regent Street Cinema, London  Link

The Cameraman (Dir. Edward Sedgwick/Buster Keaton, US, 1928) + Christmas shorts.  (Screening format – not known, 67mins) Buster (Buster Keaton) meets Sally (Marceline Day), who works as a secretary for the newsreel department at MGM, and falls hard. Trying to win her attention, Buster abandons photography in order to become a news cameraman. In spite of his early failures with a motion camera, Sally takes to him as well. However, veteran cameraman Stagg (Harold Goodwin) also fancies Sally, meaning Buster will need to learn how to film quickly before he loses his job.  Find out more at slantmagazine.com .  With live piano accompaniment from John Sweeney. St Phillip’s Cathedral, Birmingham    Link

22 December

Laurel & Hardy – Silent Magic including  Two Tars (Dir. James Parrot, 1928) + You’re Darn Tooting (Dir. E L Kennedy, 1928) + Putting Pants on Philip (Dir. Clyde Bruckman, 1927) + Big Business (James W Hormer/Leo McCarey, 1929)  (Screening format – not known, 21/20/19/19 mins)  Two Tars sees L&H as sailors on leave, who pick up two girls and spend the afternoon driving in the country. But when they find themselves in the middle of a huge traffic jam tempers boil over and soon the street is a mess of mangled cars and car parts.    In You’re Darn Tooting L&H are sacked from their orchestral jobs so they try their luck at being street musicians, but the tiffs they get into with each other soon spread to passers by in general, until the street is filled with men pulling each other’s pants off.  In Putting Pants on Philip, Stan is a sex-mad Scot newly arrived in America while Ollie plays his uncle, desperate to get him out of a kilt and into some trousers. In Big Business L&H are selling christmas trees in mid-summer.  When customer James Finlayson doesn’t want to buy mayhem ensues.  With live organ accompaniment by Donald McKenzie.  Regent Street Cinema, London  Link

The Cameraman (Dir. Edward Sedgwick/Buster Keaton, US, 1928) + Christmas shorts.  (Screening format – not known, 67mins) Buster (Buster Keaton) meets Sally (Marceline Day), who works as a secretary for the newsreel department at MGM, and falls hard. Trying to win her attention, Buster abandons photography in order to become a news cameraman. In spite of his early failures with a motion camera, Sally takes to him as well. However, veteran cameraman Stagg (Harold Goodwin) also fancies Sally, meaning Buster will need to learn how to film quickly before he loses his job.  Find out more at slantmagazine.com .  With live piano accompaniment from John Sweeney.   Coventry Cathedral, Coventry  Link

29 December

Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1927) (Screening format –not known , 149 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored so that at last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at silentfilm.org .  With recorded soundtrack.  KinoKulture, Oswestry Link

 


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