July – December

 


 

 

 

 


July

1 – 4 July (4 Screenings)

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  Based on two plays by the German author Frank Wedekind, Erdgeist (Earth Spirit, 1895), which Pabst himself had directed for the stage, and Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora’s Box, 1904), the silent drama follows the tumultuous life of the showgirl Lulu whose unselfconscious sexuality brings about the ruin of all those that fall for her and eventually her own.  In a daring move, Pabst chose a little known American actress over the more experienced Marlene Dietrich for the part of Lulu, a decision that made the young Louise Brooks an international star. Her innocent looks paired with her natural erotic allure and sense of movement – Brooks was also a dancer – perfectly matched Pabst’s idea of his heroine as unwitting seductress. Subjected to cuts to eliminate some of its “scandalous” content and unfavourably reviewed by critics at the time, it is now considered one of the boldest and most modern films of the Weimar era highlighting Pabst’s command of camera language and montage.  Find out more at silentlondon.co.uk .  With recorded soundtrack. Triskel Arts Centre, Cork   Link

4 July

The Red Lantern (Dir. Albert Capellani, US, 1919 ) ( Screening format – BluRay,  70 mins) The Red Lantern tells the story of Mahlee, a Eurasian, Joan of Arc-like heroine, set against the background of China’s 1900 Boxer Rebellion. The film was an instant success, thanks to an unprecedented advertising campaign and the star qualities of diva Alla Nazimova. The Russian Nazimova, who had a highly successful stage career, joining Constantin Stanislavski’s Moscow Arts Theatre and appearing in theatres across Europe and also on Broadway, plays a dual role in the film as two half-sisters, Mahlee and Blanche Sackville. Noah Beery is one of her co-stars and both Reginald Denny and Anna May Wong make uncredited appearances. The 14-year-old Chinese-American actress made her film debut here as a lantern-bearer. A spectacular and lavish production from Metro Pictures, directed by Albert Capellani who co-authored the scenario with June Mathis, one of the top film writers for the silent period. This fully tinted and toned restoration will be screened courtesy of the Royal Belgian Film Archive. Find out more at wikipedia.org   A Kennington Bioscope presentation.  With live piano accompaniment.  The Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London  Link

Phantom Of The Opera (Dir. Rupert Julian, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 103mins)  A title that needs no introduction, The Phantom of the Opera has spawned many remakes, remasters and sequels. This original film version, produced with moments of early Technicolour, sees Lon Chaney, the ‘Man of a Thousand Faces’ perform one of his most iconic roles. His ghastly make-up and outrageous performance made this title a benchmark in the American silent film era. The film was a critical and commercial success upon release, and still stands as an important film in cinematic history to this day, with press quotes from the time labelling the film an ‘ultra-fantastic melodrama’ (New York Times), ‘produced on a stupendous scale’ (Moving Picture World) and ‘probably the greatest inducement to nightmare that has yet been screened’ (Variety).  The mysterious phantom (Lon Chaney) is a vengeful composer living in the catacombs under the Paris Opera House, determined to promote the career of  the singer he loves (Mary Philbin).  Famed for the phantom’s shock unmasking, incredible set designs and the masked ball sequence, it still packs a punch. Find out more at wikipedia.org. With live musical accompaniment by acclaimed musicians Minima. Deal Fstival Of Music And Arts, Deal, Kent  Link

7 July

Kennington Bioscope Silent Railway Special   All aboard for another Kennington Bioscope special! An all-day excursion into the greatest railroadin’ moments of silent cinema.  Thrill to the train of events that put movie heroines Ruth Roland, Helen Holmes and Gloria Swanson in peril! Express hilarity with Monty Banks aboard a runaway train! Signal your approval of Jean Arthur in The Block Signal (1926). Climb aboard The Flying Scotsman (1929) with Kevin Brownlow, in the rare silent version that differs radically from the talkie. Ride along with the Railroad Raiders of ’62 (1911) – a precursor to Buster Keaton’s The General (1926) – but don’t be afraid of The Ghost Train (1927). Try to catch up with The Runaway Express (1926) and The Blue Express (1929). Rolling in from the sidings will be plenty of other shorts, among them Pimple’s The Whip (1917) and .  A Kennington Bioscope presentation.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London Link

8 July

The Goat (Dir. Buster Keaton/Mal St Clair, US, 1921) + Sailors Beware (Dir. Fred Guiol/Hal Yates, US, 1927) (Screening format – not Known, 27/20mins)  In The Goat, Buster Keaton is already on the run from the cops when he’s mistaken for murderer Dead Shot Dan (portrayed, incidentally, by Keaton’s co-director Mal St. Clair). Keaton has eluded the previous group of policeman, but he’s no match for the ill-tempered, heavyweight detective Joe Roberts who’s hot on his trail…or is he? The battle of wits and punishing physical stunts is a pleasure to behold — Keaton wrings every bit of mirth from props such as an old-fashioned dump truck, an elevator, windows and, of course, the passing train. A delightful, fast-moving film.Find out more at wikipedia.org Sailors Beware Stan is an honest cab driver, unaware that his current fares are a couple of slick con artists: Anita Garvin and her midget husband who dresses as a baby. When they leave the cab with their fare unpaid and the meter running, Stan gives chase when they board an ocean liner and comedy follows.  This is not yet a Laurel and Hardy film but a Stan Laurel film with Oliver Hardy in an important supporting role.  Many cite this film as being the one that opened many eyes to the potential Laurel and Hardy had as a team. While they share but a few moments together, it is those moments that are charged with a bit of extra comic electricity and a hint of what was to follow.  Find out more at  imdb.com.  With live musical accompaniment by The Harcourt Players.  The Electric Cinema, Birmingham Link

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  Based on two plays by the German author Frank Wedekind, Erdgeist (Earth Spirit, 1895), which Pabst himself had directed for the stage, and Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora’s Box, 1904), the silent drama follows the tumultuous life of the showgirl Lulu whose unselfconscious sexuality brings about the ruin of all those that fall for her and eventually her own.  In a daring move, Pabst chose a little known American actress over the more experienced Marlene Dietrich for the part of Lulu, a decision that made the young Louise Brooks an international star. Her innocent looks paired with her natural erotic allure and sense of movement – Brooks was also a dancer – perfectly matched Pabst’s idea of his heroine as unwitting seductress. Subjected to cuts to eliminate some of its “scandalous” content and unfavourably reviewed by critics at the time, it is now considered one of the boldest and most modern films of the Weimar era highlighting Pabst’s command of camera language and montage.  Find out more at silentlondon.co.uk .  With live piano accompaniment by Stephen Horne (despite what the website blurb says!) and introduced by Silent London’s Pamela Hutchinson.  RichMix Cinema, London  Link

Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1927) (Screening format –not known , 149 mins ) Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time. Following its world premiere in 1927, half an hour was cut from Fritz Lang’s masterpiece and lost to the world. Eighty years later a spectacular discovery was made when the footage was found in a small, dusty museum in Buenos Aires. The film was then painstakingly reconstructed and digitally restored so that at last audiences could see the iconic futuristic fairy tale as Lang had envisioned it. Find out more at silentfilm.org   With live musical accompaniment by electro-improvisational group Grok.  Genesis Cinema, London  Link

13 July

Phantom Of The Opera (Dir. Rupert Julian, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 103mins)  A title that needs no introduction, The Phantom of the Opera has spawned many remakes, remasters and sequels. This original film version, produced with moments of early Technicolour, sees Lon Chaney, the ‘Man of a Thousand Faces’ perform one of his most iconic roles. His ghastly make-up and outrageous performance made this title a benchmark in the American silent film era. The film was a critical and commercial success upon release, and still stands as an important film in cinematic history to this day, with press quotes from the time labelling the film an ‘ultra-fantastic melodrama’ (New York Times), ‘produced on a stupendous scale’ (Moving Picture World) and ‘probably the greatest inducement to nightmare that has yet been screened’ (Variety).  The mysterious phantom (Lon Chaney) is a vengeful composer living in the catacombs under the Paris Opera House, determined to promote the career of  the singer he loves (Mary Philbin).  Famed for the phantom’s shock unmasking, incredible set designs and the masked ball sequence, it still packs a punch. Find out more at wikipedia.org. With live musical accompaniment by acclaimed musicians Minima.  Queen Mother Theatre Studio, Hitchin  Link

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – Not known, 96mins) A German Expressionis horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational masterwork of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org .  With live musical accompaniment by Dmytro Morykit. Wilton’s Music Hall, London Link

15 July

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 135mins) For film details see 8 July above. With recorded soundtrack. Institute Francais, London  Link

17 July

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 135mins) For film details see 8 July above. With recorded soundtrack.   Artrix Arts Centre, Bromsgrove  Link

18 July

When You Fall Down  Inspired by the career of Buster Keaton, James Dangerfield has created a musical that explores the silent star’s life and career. The show follows Keaton’s life from his first filmmaking experiences in 1917 to his signing on with MGM 11 years later. When You Fall Down previewed this year in London, and received its premiere at the 2017 International Buster Keaton Festival in Michigan, USA. Featuring original music and songs, join us for this show celebrating “The Great Stone Face” and the magic of movie-makingThe Other Place, Edinburgh Link

Kipps (Dir. Howard M Shore, UK, 1921) (Screening format – 35mm, ? mins) Kipps is an adaptation of H.G. Wells’ bittersweet comedy of English social class and manners, the story of a draper’s assistant who has an opportunity to move up in the world. Things don’t always go according to plan…Starring the wonderful George K. Arthur, whose performance was highly praised by Chaplin, and Edna Flugrath, and directed by Harold Shaw for Stoll pictures, it was much praised on it’s release, not least by H.G. Wells himself (who apparently features as an extra in the film). Featuring beautiful location shooting in Folkestone, Canterbury and at the Savoy Hotel, this is a lovely and little known film. A 35mm presentation courtesy of the BFI. Find out more at wikipedia.org  A Kennington Bioscope presentation.  With live piano accompaniment from Neil Brand.  The Cinema Museum, Lambeth, London Link

19 July

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 135mins) For film details see 8 July above. With recorded soundtrack.   Artrix Arts Centre, Bromsgrove  Link

The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, UK, 1927)  (Screening format – not known, 91 mins ) In The Lodger, a serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the #avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org .   With live musical accompaniment by acclaimed musicians Minima.  The Point, Eastleigh, Hampshire  Link

22 July

Brownlow on Hollywood (Screening format – TBC, 90 mins) Kevin Brownlow and David Gill’s Hollywood series, narrated by James Mason, created a generational shift in the public’s consciousness of the history of Hollywood and their appreciation of silent film – helping spawn the vibrant silent cinema scene we know today. The BFI is thrilled to invite Kevin Brownlow himself to present an episode, plus some bonus extra footage. Find out more at cinephiliabeyond.org  BFI Southbank, London Link

The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (Dir. Alfred Hitchcock, UK, 1927)  (Screening format – not known, 91 mins ) In The Lodger, a serial killer known as “The Avenger” is on the loose in London, murdering blonde women. A mysterious man (Ivor Novello)  arrives at the house of Mr. and Mrs. Bunting looking for a room to rent. The Bunting’s daughter (June Tripp)  is a blonde model and is seeing one of the detectives (Malcolm Keen) assigned to the case. The detective becomes jealous of the lodger and begins to suspect he may be the #avenger.  Based on a best-selling novel by Marie Belloc Lowndes, first published in 1913, loosely based on the Jack the Ripper murders,  The Lodger was Hitchcock’s first thriller, and his first critical and commercial success. Made shortly after his return from Germany, the film betrays the influence of the German expressionist tradition established in such films as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919) and Nosferatu (1922). Find out more at silentfilm.org .   With live musical accompaniment by acclaimed musicians Minima. Martley Fringe Festival, Worcester   Link

26 July

Sunrise; A Song of Two Humans (Dir. F W Murnau, US, 1927) + Goat (Dir. Buster Keaton/Mal St Clair, US, 1921) (Screening format – not known, 94/27mins) Sunrise, F W Murnau’s debut American film, made at the technical zenith of the silent era  but already heralding the arrival of the talkies being one of the first silents made with synchronized musical score and sound effects soundtrack.  The simple story of a husband’s betrayal of his wife with a treacherous city girl, Sunrise moves from a fairytale-like depiction of rural life to a dynamic portrait of the bustling modern American city. Explored in elaborate tracking shots by Charles Rocher and Karl Struss’s pioneering camerawork, the city set was one of the most costly yet produced.  The result was a commercial flop, though the achievement did not go unheralded: Sunrise was awarded a special Oscar for unique and artistic production at the first ever Academy Awards and Janet Gaynor won the first Academy Award for Best Actress for her performance.  The film’s legacy has endured, and it is now widely considered a masterpiece with many calling it the greatest film of the silent era. Find out more at theguardian.com  In The Goat, Buster Keaton is already on the run from the cops when he’s mistaken for murderer Dead Shot Dan (portrayed, incidentally, by Keaton’s co-director Mal St. Clair). Keaton has eluded the previous group of policeman, but he’s no match for the ill-tempered, heavyweight detective Joe Roberts who’s hot on his trail…or is he? The battle of wits and punishing physical stunts is a pleasure to behold — Keaton wrings every bit of mirth from props such as an old-fashioned dump truck, an elevator, windows and, of course, the passing train. A delightful, fast-moving film.Find out more at wikipedia.org. With live jazz accompaniment by the Meg Morley Trio (Meg Morley on piano, Richard Sadler on double bass and Emiliano Caroselli on drums).  1901 Arts Club, London  Link

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 135mins) For film details see 8 July above. With recorded soundtrack. Institute Francais, London  Link

27 July

The Phantom Carriage (Dir. Victor Sjostrom, Swe, 1921) (Screening format – Not known, 100 mins)  The threads of silent cinema are tightly woven into some of the greatest cinema ever made, yet few yarns are quite as bold as Victor Sjöström’s Phantom Carriage (Körkarlen). Based on a novel by Nobel laureate Selma Lagerlöf, the tale tells of the last person to die on New Year’s Eve, who as per folklore is cursed to ride Death’s carriage, collecting souls for the year ahead.  The image of Death walking amongst us recurs throughout the history of the visual arts, but Sjöström brought it to cinema, in a way that still reverberates to this day. Famously echoed by Ingmar Bergman in the Seventh Seal, the troubled Swede spoke at length how Sjöström’s film grabbed him and shook him as a 12 year old boy. But it is through Sjöström’s innovative use of flashback and ghostly superimposition that his mark can be seen all the way through to film history, right up to last year’s A Ghost Story.  Not without its detractors, the critic André Bazin derided the film’s use of double exposure, 25 years after the it’s original release. The comments sparked debate in Cahiers Du Cinema, and caused a new wave of French critics and filmmakers to revisit the film.  Find out more at  filmcomment.com. Presented s part of Cinema Rediscovered festival.   Introduced by Peter Walsh.  With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Watershed Cinema, Bristol Link

28 July

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – DCP, 135mins) For film details see 8 July above. With recorded soundtrack.  Broadway Cinema, Nottingham  Link

August

5 August

Pandora’s Box (Dir. G W Pabst, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 135mins)  Based on two plays by the German author Frank Wedekind, Erdgeist (Earth Spirit, 1895), which Pabst himself had directed for the stage, and Die Büchse der Pandora (Pandora’s Box, 1904), the silent drama follows the tumultuous life of the showgirl Lulu whose unselfconscious sexuality brings about the ruin of all those that fall for her and eventually her own.  In a daring move, Pabst chose a little known American actress over the more experienced Marlene Dietrich for the part of Lulu, a decision that made the young Louise Brooks an international star. Her innocent looks paired with her natural erotic allure and sense of movement – Brooks was also a dancer – perfectly matched Pabst’s idea of his heroine as unwitting seductress. Subjected to cuts to eliminate some of its “scandalous” content and unfavourably reviewed by critics at the time, it is now considered one of the boldest and most modern films of the Weimar era highlighting Pabst’s command of camera language and montage.  Find out more at silentlondon.co.uk .  With recorded soundtrack. Electric Cinema, Birmingham  Link

September

1 September

SWS Silent Film Open Day  South West Silents and Bristol’s 20th Century Flicks are getting together to screen a day of silent films. Over the course of the day they will screen a wide selection of silent films in both of Flicks’ specially made cinemas. In the Kino Cinema, they will screen a selection of shorts and documentaries while in the newly built Videodrome Cinema, there will be a range of feature films.  Intriguingly they won’t be announcing the titles of the films being screened here, you will just have to turn up sometime on the day and see what is on.  But expect classic names such as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Douglas Fairbanks, Lillian Gish, Mary Pickford, Gloria Swanson and also names you might never have heard of. So you will have plenty to choose from over the course of the day between both cinemas. They are also planning a special ‘Kino Kids’ section in the early part of the day as well.  20th Century Flicks, Bristol Link

27 September

Dawson City – Frozen Time (Dir. Bill Morrison, US, 2016) This documentary pieces together the bizarre true story of a collection of some 500 films dating from 1910s – 1920s, which were lost for over 50 years until discovered buried in a sub-arctic swimming pool deep in the Yukon Territory, in Dawson City, located about 350 miles south of the Arctic Circle. Using these permafrost protected, rare silent films and newsreels, archival footage, interviews and historical photographs to tell the story, and accompanied by an enigmatic score by Sigur Rós collaborator and composer Alex Somers (Captain Fantastic), Dawson City: Frozen Time depicts a unique history of a Canadian gold rush town by chronicling the life cycle of a singular film collection through its exile, burial, rediscovery, and salvation – and through that collection, how a First Nation hunting camp was transformed and displaced. Find out more at picturepalacepictures.comNo.6 Cinema, Portsmouth Link

28 September

Battleship Potemkin (Dir. Sergei Eisenstein, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 75mins) Considered one of the most important films in the history of silent pictures, as well as possibly Eisenstein’s greatest work, Battleship Potemkin brought Eisenstein’s theories of cinema art to the world in a powerful showcase; his emphasis on montage, his stress of intellectual contact, and his treatment of the mass instead of the individual as the protagonist. The film tells the story of the mutiny on the Russian ship Prince Potemkin during the 1905 uprising.Their mutiny was short-lived, however, as during their attempts to get the population of Odessa to join the uprising, soldiers arrived and laid waste to the insurgents.  Battleship Potemkin is a work of extraordinary pictorial beauty and great elegance of form. It is symmetrically broken into five movements or acts. In the first of these, “Men and Maggots,” the flagrant mistreatment of the sailors at the hands of their officers is demonstrated, while the second, “Drama on the Quarterdeck,” presents the actual mutiny and the ship’s arrival in Odessa. “Appeal from the Dead” establishes the solidarity of the citizens of Odessa with the mutineers. It is the fourth sequence, “The Odessa Steps,” which depicts the massacre of the citizens, that thrust Eisenstein and his film into the historical eminence that both occupy today. It is unquestionably the most famous sequence of its kind in film history, and Eisenstein displays his legendary ability to convey large-scale action scenes. The shot of the baby carriage tumbling down the long staircase has been re-created in many films. The sequence’s power is such that the film’s conclusion, “Meeting the Squadron,” in which the Potemkin in a show of brotherhood is allowed to pass through the squadron unharmed, is anticlimactic.  Find out more at classicartfilms.com .  Presented in conjunction with South West Silents.  With recorded score.  No.6 Cinema, Portsmouth Link

29 September

Zeebrugge (Dir.  A V Brambell/H Bruce Woolfe, UK, 1924) (Screening format – Not known, 60mins) April 23rd 1918 saw one of the most daring and heroic raids of the First World War with the British Royal Navy attempting to block the Belgian port of Bruges-Zeebrugge, a key U-boat and light shipping base for the Imperial German Navy. Based on the raid, directors Woolfe and Bramble’s much forgotten gem is a film that recreates the famous heroic attack at Zeebrugge with a mixture of drama and authentic First World War film material including captured German film as well as some of the most advance special effects of the time.  Find out more at imdb.com.  Presented in conjunction with South West Silents.  With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne and Martin Pyne.  No.6 Cinema, Portsmouth Link

Nelson (Dir. Maurice Elvey, UK, 1918) (Screening format – Not known, 128mins) Rarely seen since its original release, Maurice Elvey’s masterpiece on the life and career of Admiral Nelson was a major passion project for Britain’s most prolific film director. Written by Alfred Hitchcock’s scriptwriter Eliot Stannard and made with the support of the Admiralty at a time when the Navy needed to recruit. The film transforms Nelson into an action packed hero for the British audiences of World World One, celebrating his heroic status and recreating famous moments in British Naval history. Elvey’s action packed film is very much an education as well as entertainment with stunning cinematography and razor sharp action sequences mixed with model shots and animation. Part of the film was shot on HMS Victory, making NELSON the only feature film ever made on the Royal Navy’s most famous ship.  Find out more at wikipedia.org. Presented in conjunction with South West Silents.  With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne and Martin Pyne. Introduced by Maurice Elvey expert Lucie Dutton.   No.6 Cinema, Portsmouth Link

October

10 October

Metropolis (Dir. Fritz Lang, 1927)(Screening format –DVD, Jan ’05 pre-restored version, 118mins)  Made in Germany during the Weimar period, Metropolis is set in a futuristic urban dystopia and follows the attempts of Freder (Gustav Frohlich), the wealthy son of the city’s ruler, and Maria (Brigitte Helm), a poor worker, to overcome the vast gulf separating the classes of their city. Filming took place in 1925 at a cost of approximately five million Reichmarks, making it the most expensive film ever released up to that point. It is regarded as a pioneering work of science fiction and is among the most influential films of all time.  Find out more at silentfilm.org With live piano accompaniment by Dmytro Morykit.  Elgar Room, Royal Albert Hall, London  Link

November

1 November

J’Accuse (Dir. Abel Gance, Fr, 1919) (Screening format – not known, 166 mins) Two men who love the same woman – one her husband, one her lover – meet in the trenches of World War One.  Their story becomes a microcosm for the horrors of war, in this silent film classic. Abel Gance’s epic war film J’Accuse turns 99 this year. Released in 1919, the film includes real battlefields of the first world war on screen, and depicts the very real tragedy and horror of war. The ‘return of the dead’ sequence at the end of the film was shot in the south of France, using 2,000 soldiers who had come back on leave. Gance himself recalled: “The conditions in which we filmed were profoundly moving… These men had come straight from the Front – from Verdun – and they were due back eight days later. They played the dead knowing that in all probability they’d be dead themselves before long. Within a few weeks of their return, eighty per cent had been killed.”  Find out more at tcm.com.  With live organ accompaniment by celebrated organist and composer, Dr David Bednall.  Bristol Cathedral, Bristol Link

15 November

The City Without Jews (aka Die Stadt ohne Juden) (Dir. Hans Karl Breslauer, Aus, 1924) (Screening format – not known, 80mins) A dystopian prophecy of intolerance, Die Stadt ohne Juden is ominous, portentous, and completely unforgettable. H K Breslauer’s satirical dystopia shows the cultural and economic impoverishment of a city that expels its Jewish population, and is disturbingly prophetic in its depiction of the murderous anti-semitism in Vienna in the wake of the First World War.  And the story of the film is almost as remarkable as its content. Lost during the Second World War, this version was only rediscovered in a Paris flea market in 2015. The political message is more sharply articulated in this newly restored version, with a hitherto lost ending and other sequences. For anyone interested in 20th-century history, this Austrian expressionist film is essential viewing.Find out more at theguardian.com.  With new score composed by Olga Neuwirth and performed by the PHACE Ensemble conducted by Nacho de Paz.  Milton Court Concert Hall, Barbican, London  Link

 

 


NB. Whilst every effort has been taken to ensure that the information contained in these listings is accurate, silentfilmcalendar.org can take no responsibility for any errors or inaccuracies. You are strongly advised to confirm with the venue that the event remains as detailed, particularly if traveling any distance to attend.