Live Screenings – October – December


 

October

1 October

The Hound Of The Baskervilles (Dir.  Richard Oswald, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 65mins)  The last Sherlock Holmes adaptation in the silent film era, this version was long thought lost.  However, a copy was discovered in 2009 (along with nine other films), in the basement of a Polish church, apparently hidden by a priest in violation of an earlier Papal edict banning the showing and storage of films on church property.  The film boasted an unusually international cast, including American actor Carlyle Blackwell, German actor Fritz Rasp, Russian actor Alexander Murski and Italian actor Livio Pavanelli and the result is a reasonably accurate retelling of Conan Doyls’s story and an effective thriller.   But coming right at the end of the silent era, this version, although popular in Europe, quickly fell from view, particularly after the release of an English talkie version in 1931. Find out more at silentfilm.org With live piano accompaniment by Mike Nolan.  Hippodrome Cinema, Bo’ness  Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org With recorded score.  Great War Huts, Brook Farm Camp, Bury St Edmunds. Link

 

2 October

The Kid (Dir. Charles Chaplin, US, 1921) + One Week (Dir. Buster Keaton/Eddie Cline, 1920)(Screening format – not known, 68/19 mins) Chaplin’s first full-length feature is a silent masterpiece about a little tramp who discovers a little orphan and brings him up but is left desolate when the orphanage reclaims him. Beneath the comedy, there are definitely some more serious thematic elements at work and and the film is noted for its pathos. In that regard, the opening inter-title proves to be true: “A picture with a smile — and perhaps, a tear.”Chaplin directed, produced and starred in the film, as well as composed the score.  Find out more at wikipedia.org One Week sees Buster and his new bride struggling with a pre-fabricated home unaware that his bride’s former suitor has renumbered all of the boxes.  Find out more at wikipedia.org.     With live musical accompaniment by WurlitzaMemorial Hall, Landulph,  Cornwall Link

 

4 October

Cabinet of Dr Caligari (Dir. Robert Wiene, 1920) (Screening format – not known,  77 mins) In the village of Holstenwall, fairground hypnotist Dr Caligari (Werner Krauss) puts on show a somnambulist called Cesare (Conrad Veidt) who has been asleep for twenty three years.  At night, Cesare walks the streets murdering people on the doctor’s orders.  A student (Friedrich Feher) suspects Caligari after a friend is found dead and it transpires that the doctor is the director of a lunatic asylum.  Fueled by the pessimism and gloom of post-war Germany, the sets by Hermann Warm stand unequaled as a shining example of Expressionist design.  Find out more at  wikipedia.org. Presented by Pound Arts in conjunction with South West Silents.  With live musical accompaniment by Meg MorleyPound Arts, Corsham Link

 

Steamboat Bill Jr   (Dir. Buster Keaton/Charles Reisner, US, 1928)   (Screening format – not known,  71  mins)  In Steamboat Bill Jr a crusty river boat captain hopes that his long departed son’s return will help him compete with a business rival.  Unfortunately, William Canfield Jnr (Buster Keaton) is an effete college boy.  Worse still, he has fallen for the business rival’s daughter (Marion Byron).     Featuring some of Buster’s finest and most dangerous stunts, it’s a health and safety nightmare maybe but it’s entertainment that will live forever.  The final storm sequence is still as breathtaking today as it was on first release. Not a commercial success at the time, this is now rightly regarded as a Keaton classic. Find out more at Wikipedia  With live musical accompaniment from the Buster Birch jazz quartet.  Sands Films, RotherhitheLink

 

5 October

Amok (Dir. Kote Marjanishvili, USSR/Geo, 1927) (Screening format – digital, 70 mins)  Amok  is one of the great Georgian films from the silent era, starring perhaps the greatest Soviet star of her age Nato Vachnadze.  Based on the novella Der Amokläufer by Stefan Zweig, this film was the first adaption of a foreign literary work in Georgian cinema and tells the story of a European doctor arriving in a British colony where he meets an English woman seeking an abortion. The doctor’s obsession with the woman creates a dramatic and tragic storyline.  The film was stored in the vaults of Russia’s state Gosfilmofond for decades until the the reels for were returned to Georgia where they were restored and  digitised into a high-resolution format in 1019.   Find out more at  imdb.com  Presented as part of the 6th London Georgian Film Festival.  Introduced by Natalia Jugheli, great-granddaughter of Nato Vachnadze.  With live musical accompaniment by Vazha Marr and Giorgi Kuchukhidze.  Institut Francais, London  Link

9 October

Foolish Wives (Dir. Erich von Stroheim, US, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 147mins)  In Stroheim’s 1922 film a con artist masquerades as Russian nobility and attempts to seduce the wife of an American diplomat.  When released in 1922, the film was the most expensive film made up to  that time, and billed by Universal Studios as the “first million-dollar movie” to come out of Hollywood. Originally, von Stroheim intended the film to run anywhere between 6 and 10 hours, and be shown over two evenings, but Universal executives opposed this idea. The studio bosses cut the film drastically before the release date. The opulent sets – with the California coast standing in for Monaco – shine in this glorious new restoration.  Find out more at sensesofcinema.comPresented as part of the London Film Festival.  Introduced by noted film historian Kevin Brownlow and with piano accompaniment by Neil Brand BFI Southbank, London Link

 

13 October

Journey to the Isles: Marjory Kennedy-Fraser A mesmerising glimpse into the landscapes, folktales and songs that inspired one of Scotland’s great early collectors of Traditional Arts.  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser began collecting Hebridean songs in 1905, fired by a desire to preserve and celebrate the musical riches of the islands’ people. These two disarming films, made by Kennedy-Fraser herself provide a snapshot of her work and the culture of the people she devoted her life to studying, all the while revealing the warmth of her personality and her passion for the rugged beauty of the Hebrides.  Joining audiences on this journey to the Isles are acclaimed live performers: Marion Kenny, one of Scotland’s leading storytellers, and award-winning musician, singer and songwriter Mairi Campbell. Weaving together words, music and song alongside Kennedy-Fraser’s enchanting films, Marion and Mairi will conjure the sounds and landscapes captured by this key figure of Scotland’s Celtic Revival.  Commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival. Community Hall, Isle of Eigg    Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org With live Wurlitzer organ accompaniment by Aaron Hawthorne.  Victoria Hall, Saltaire Link

 

14 October

The Last Warning (Dir. Paul Leni, US, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 89mins) This cracking thriller mystery flick reunited the director and star of The Cat and the Canary (1927), celebrated German filmmaker Paul Leni and one of the silent era’s most popular stars Laura La Plante.  La Plante plays Doris, the lead actress in a play called The Snare. Her co-star dies a mysterious death on stage, but when his body disappears the case goes cold. Years later the victim’s friend gathers the original cast together and revives the show in an attempt to solve the crime. But dark and supernatural forces are at work, seemingly determined that the show should not go on.  This is an entertaining and stylish whodunit, making the most of both the suspenseful play-within-a-play and the “real” murder mystery unfolding off-stage. Expect a dressing room full of suspects, secret passages, and ghostly apparitions.  The Last Warning was Leni s final film before his untimely death, and a prime showcase for La Plante, Universal s leading lady of the era,  A visual artist at the peak of his career, Leni’s camera never stops shifting, offering cutaways and trick shots involving nervous could-be culprits, a highly suspicious sleuth, and cast members who suddenly disappear in the darkened theatre. The result is a cinematic funhouse that restlessly cross-examines the suspense of the story s stage play against the real murder mystery saga, all unfolding amid the outstanding production design of Charles D. Hall.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org  With live musical accompaniment by Jane Gardner (piano) and Hazel Morrison (percussion).  Hippodrome Cinema, Bo’ness. Link

 

The Mark Of Zorro (Dir. Fred Niblo, US, 1920) (Screening format – not known, 85mins)  Don Diego Vega (Douglas Fairbanks) masquerades as an ineffectual fop to bamboozle his enemies and conceal his secret persona: ‘Zorro’: avenger of the oppressed. The first King of Hollywood – dashing, athletic Fairbanks, pretty much defined the swashbuckling genre with this rip-roaring adventure flick. Featuring horseback stunts, witty chase sequences and sword fighting, this entertaining romp achieves a satisfying blend of humour and heroics that remains the benchmark for action films today.  Find out more at  silentfilm.org  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live piano accompaniment by Jonny BestHull Truck Theatre, Hull Link

 

Journey to the Isles: Marjory Kennedy-Fraser A mesmerising glimpse into the landscapes, folktales and songs that inspired one of Scotland’s great early collectors of Traditional Arts.  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser began collecting Hebridean songs in 1905, fired by a desire to preserve and celebrate the musical riches of the islands’ people. These two disarming films, made by Kennedy-Fraser herself provide a snapshot of her work and the culture of the people she devoted her life to studying, all the while revealing the warmth of her personality and her passion for the rugged beauty of the Hebrides.  Joining audiences on this journey to the Isles are acclaimed live performers: Marion Kenny, one of Scotland’s leading storytellers, and award-winning musician, singer and songwriter Mairi Campbell. Weaving together words, music and song alongside Kennedy-Fraser’s enchanting films, Marion and Mairi will conjure the sounds and landscapes captured by this key figure of Scotland’s Celtic Revival.  Commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival. Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, Skye  Link

 

15 October

Saturday Slapstick For Kids (And Their Adults)  featuring Laurel and Hardy in The Finishing Touch, Charlie Chaplin in His Musical Career, Léontine in Léontine’s Boat and Léontine Flies Away.   Laurel & Hardy try to build a house, Charlie Chaplin makes a mess of moving a piano, and Léontine causes mayhem – plus a dancing pig and a strange band of disappearing street musicians.  Saturday Slapstick is a 50 minute show which brings live-scored silent film alive for children and adults alike, and includes opportunities to join in with making music and sound effects.  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live musical accompaniment by Liz Hanks and Adam Fairhall.   Picture House, Hebden Bridge  Link

 

Journey to the Isles: Marjory Kennedy-Fraser A mesmerising glimpse into the landscapes, folktales and songs that inspired one of Scotland’s great early collectors of Traditional Arts.  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser began collecting Hebridean songs in 1905, fired by a desire to preserve and celebrate the musical riches of the islands’ people. These two disarming films, made by Kennedy-Fraser herself provide a snapshot of her work and the culture of the people she devoted her life to studying, all the while revealing the warmth of her personality and her passion for the rugged beauty of the Hebrides.  Joining audiences on this journey to the Isles are acclaimed live performers: Marion Kenny, one of Scotland’s leading storytellers, and award-winning musician, singer and songwriter Mairi Campbell. Weaving together words, music and song alongside Kennedy-Fraser’s enchanting films, Marion and Mairi will conjure the sounds and landscapes captured by this key figure of Scotland’s Celtic Revival.  Commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival. An Lanntair, Lewis   Link

 

16 October

Funny Business Chaos and pandemonium reign in this silent film comedy show suitable for all the family.   Featuring Laurel and Hardy in Two Tars, Charlie Chaplin in A Film Johnnie, Harold Lloyd and Snub Pollard in Are Crooks Dishonest, and Buster Keaton in CopsLaurel & Hardy get stuck in a traffic jam and somehow end up destroying most of the cars, and Buster Keaton is chased by an entire police force. Charlie Chaplin gatecrashes a movie studio and causes havoc, while Harold Lloyd attempts to outwit a phony psychic.  With snappy action, visual comedy, and huge amounts of silliness, this show is most suitable for children from age eight upwards – but children of all ages (including babies) are welcome.  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live musical accompaniment by Jazz pianist Adam Fairhall.   Ritz Cinema,  Thirsk, Link

 

17 October

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – digital, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org With recorded score by Hans Erdmann. BFI Southbank, London Link

 

Journey to the Isles: Marjory Kennedy-Fraser A mesmerising glimpse into the landscapes, folktales and songs that inspired one of Scotland’s great early collectors of Traditional Arts.  Marjory Kennedy-Fraser began collecting Hebridean songs in 1905, fired by a desire to preserve and celebrate the musical riches of the islands’ people. These two disarming films, made by Kennedy-Fraser herself provide a snapshot of her work and the culture of the people she devoted her life to studying, all the while revealing the warmth of her personality and her passion for the rugged beauty of the Hebrides.  Joining audiences on this journey to the Isles are acclaimed live performers: Marion Kenny, one of Scotland’s leading storytellers, and award-winning musician, singer and songwriter Mairi Campbell. Weaving together words, music and song alongside Kennedy-Fraser’s enchanting films, Marion and Mairi will conjure the sounds and landscapes captured by this key figure of Scotland’s Celtic Revival.  Commissioned by the Hippodrome Silent Film Festival.  Live-streamed and followed by a Q&A.   Eden Court, Inverness   Link

 

20 October

Oliver Twist (Dir. Frank Lloyd, US, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 74mins) Thought lost for decades, Frank Lloyd’s adaptation of Charles Dicken’s classic tale of the boy who asked for more has an all-star cast. Starring the man of a thousand faces, Lon Chaney, as Fagin and the wunderkind of 1920s Hollywood, Jackie Coogan (straight after his heartrending debut in Chaplin’s The Kid) in the title role, this spectacular silent film gem was rediscovered in Yugoslavia in the 1970s. Find out more at editoreric.com.  Presented by Pound Arts in conjunction with South West Silents.  With live musical accompaniment by Meg MorleyPound Arts, Corsham Link

22 October

Clowning Around This triple-bill of slapstick comedy features  Harold Lloyd in Get Out and Get Under (1920), Laurel and Hardy in  Duck Soup (1927) and Buster Keaton in The Blacksmith (1922).  Harold Lloyd has some trouble with his car, Laurel & Hardy are a pair of down-and-outs who take over a fancy mansion, and Buster Keaton is a blacksmith’s hapless assistant. No matter what these clowns try to do, everything always goes wrong. Visual comedy, zippy action, and oodles of silliness are the order of the day – and the whole thing will be brought to life with live piano music.  This show is most suitable for children from age eight upwards and their adults, but children of all ages (including babies) are welcome.  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live musical accompaniment by Jazz pianist Adam Fairhall.   Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield, Link

 

Haxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages (Dir. Benjamin Christensen, Swe., 1922) ( Screening format – not known, 105mins) A fictionalized documentary with dramatic reconstructions showing the evolution of witchcraft, from its pagan roots to its confusion with hysteria in modern (1922) Europe. Based partly on Christensen’s study of the  Malleus Maleficarum, a 15th-century German guide for inquisitors, Häxan is a study of how superstition and the misunderstanding of diseases and mental illness could lead to the hysteria of the witch hunts.  Although it won acclaim in Denmark and Sweden when first released, Haxan was heavily censored or banned outright in many countries.  But it is now considered to be Christensen’s finest work, a witches’ brew of the scary, the grotesque, and the darkly humorous. Find out more at thedevilsmanor.blogspot.co.uk .  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live musical accompaniment by the YSFF Improvising Ensemble, featuring Irine Rosnes, Liz Hanks, Trevor Bartlett, Jonny Best, Rob Bentall and Jon Boden.   Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield Link

 

23 October

The Adventures of Prince Achmed (Dir. Lotte Reiniger , Ger, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 65mins) The first feature-length animation in film history, masterminded by Lotte Reiniger and hand-tinted frame by frame. Based on ‘The Arabian Nights’, the film tells the epic tale of Prince Achmed, who is tricked into mounting a magical flying horse by a wicked sorcerer. The horse carries Achmed off on a series of adventures, over the course of which he joins forces with young Aladdin, battles ogres and monsters and romances the beautiful Princess Peri Banu.Find out more at wikipedia.org .  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live musical accompaniment by  Liz Hanks, Juliana Day and Jonny Best.   Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield Link

 

Queens Of Destruction: Cinema’s First Nasty Women.  Pranks and mischief, outright destruction and unleashed fury; the ten short films screened today are a spectacular celebration of the subversive, disruptive, and provocative women of early film.  Tilly and Sally will do anything to escape the boredom of piano lessons—but their misbehaviour is at the mischievous end of the scale. Not so for Mme. Plumette, whose volcanic temper terrorises everyone she meets, or teenage renegade Léontine, who floods and sets fire to her own house.  Inspired by Donald Trump’s dismissive comment about Hilary Clinton, Cinema’s First Nasty Womenis a collection of ninety-nine American and European short films sourced from thirteen film archives around the world. Curators Maggie Hennefeld and Laura Horak have assembled three unique programmes for YSFF, of which this is the first. Programmes two and three will follow in 2023.  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live musical accompaniment by the YSFF Improvising Ensemble, featuring Irine Rosnes, Liz Hanks, Juliana Day, Trevor Bartlett, John Sweeney, Rob Bentall and Jon Boden. Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield  Link

 

Finding Lost Films: Adam Bede (Dir. Maurice Elvey, GB, 1918) (Screening format – 16mm, 43mins) More than three-quarters of films made during the silent era are lost. Some perished in studio vault fires, some were deliberately destroyed or have decayed over time. But some lost films are out there, somewhere, mislaid, or mis-labeled. Waiting to be found. A few years ago, Sheffield collector Christopher Wibberley came across a 16mm copy of Maurice Elvey’s 1918 adaptation of Adam Bede. The film had been presumed lost, except for one ten-minute reel in the National Film Archive. Elevy was a prolific director, making nearly two hundred films, including Hindle Wakes, Palais de Danse, and High Treason. Adam Bede is one of his earliest films. It survives in a tinted 16mm copy which has been digitally preserved in the National Film Archive. Christopher will project the film in 16mm for this screening – the first public showing for more than half a century.  Set in the 1850s. the film is a tense drama centred around a  farmer’s niece facing the charge of murdering her illegitimate baby.’  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live musical accompaniment by Irine Rosnes  and Jonny Best. Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield Link

 

The Bride of Glomdal (aka Glomdalsbruden) (Dir. Carl Theodor Dreyer. Nor., 1926). (Screening format – not known, 115 mins) The rural locations provide a beautiful setting for this story of Tore, a young farmer, who is determined to build up his family’s dilapidated farm and win the hand of lovely neighbour Berit, who is promised in marriage to another. The Bride of Glomdal immediately followed Dreyer’s early important work Master of the House (Denmark 1925) and preceded his move to France, where his international reputation was made with The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928).   To accommodate the theatre schedules of his actors, and to embellish what he believed to be the relatively slender plot threads of the original novel written by Jacob Breda Bull,  Dreyer uncharacteristically shot more or less off-the-cuff, albeit with a prepared list of scenes, throughout the summer of 1925. The Bride of Glomdal was among the highlights of the recent Pordenone Silent Film Festival.  Find out more at imdb.com . Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival. With live musical accompaniment by John Sweeney Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield  Link

 

A Woman Passed By (aka Une Femme A Passe) (Dir. Rene Jayet, Fr, 1927) (Screening format – not known, 60mins) A little known film from a now almost forgotten director, A Woman Passed By was Jayet’s debut film, a steamy melodrama set on the canals of France where a sailor lives with his adopted son on a barge. But when he meets an unscrupulous woman and offers her hospitality, it is only a matter of time before she has an affair with his son.  Find out more at imdb.com  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by violinist Irine Røsnes, cellist Liz Hanks and  pianist Jonny Best   Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield Link

 

Our Hospitality (Dir. Buster Keaton/John G Blystone, US, 1923) (Screening format – not known, 73mins)  Our Hospitality is a riotous satire of family feuds and Southern codes of honor. In 1831, Keaton leaves his home in New York to take charge of his family mansion down South. En route, Keaton befriends pretty Natalie Talmadge (Keaton’s real-life wife at the time), who invites him to dine at her family home. Upon meeting Talmadge’s father and brothers, Keaton learns that he is the last surviving member of a family with whom Talmadge’s kin have been feuding for over 20 years. The brothers are all for killing Keaton on the spot, but Talmadge’s father insists that the rules of hospitality be observed: so long as Keaton is a guest in the house, he will not be harmed. Thus, Keaton spends the next few reels alternately planning to sneak out of the mansion without being noticed or contriving to remain within its walls as long as possible. But once he is out of the house the chase is on, with the father and brothers in hot pursuit.  In the climactic waterfall stunt a dummy stood in for Talmadge but Keaton used no doubles, and nearly lost his life as a result.  This 7-reel silent film represents the only joint appearance of Buster Keaton and Natalie Talmadge; Keaton hoped that by spending several weeks on location with his wife, he could patch up their shaky marriage (it didn’t work). Also appearing are two other members of the Keaton family: Keaton’s ex-vaudevillian father Joe (who performs an eye-popping “high kick”) and his son Joseph Keaton IV, playing Buster as a baby. Find out more at wikipedia.org.   Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Adam Fairhall  Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield   Link

 

25 October

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  Presented by Pound Arts in co-operation with South West Silents.  With live musical accompaniment by Meg MorleyPound Arts, Corsham  Link

 

The Mysterious Lady (Dir. Fred Niblo, US, 1928) (Screening format – not known, 80mins) Before the First World War, Tania (Greta Garbo), a Russian spy, has a love affair with Austrian Captain Karl von Heinersdorff (Conrad Nagel) in order to get secret plans that he has in his possession. She falls in love with him, but steals the plans anyway. Karl is court-martialed and jailed. His uncle (Albert Pollet) helps him to escape, and Karl goes to Russia tin search of Tania.   Greta Garbo’s entrancing beauty is the main attraction in this Silent drama from MGM. Her face alone would have assured her a place in film history. But this film, which deals with World War One espionage, has other things to offer, including a good performance from Conrad Nagel as Garbo’s co-star.  Find out more at catalog.afi.com    Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Jonny Best.  Leyburn Arts & Community Centre, Leyburn  Link

 

26 October

Phantom Carriage (Dir. Victor Sjöström, Swe, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 100mins) The last person to die on New Year’s Eve before the clock strikes twelve is doomed to take the reins of Death’s chariot and work tirelessly collecting fresh souls for the next year. So says the legend that drives The Phantom Carriage (Körkarlen), directed by the father of Swedish cinema, Victor Sjöström. The story, based on a novel by Nobel Prize winner Selma Lagerlöf, concerns an alcoholic, abusive ne’er-do-well (Sjöström himself) who is shown the error of his ways, and the pure-of-heart Salvation Army sister who believes in his redemption. This extraordinarily rich and innovative silent classic (which inspired Ingmar Bergman to make movies) is a Dickensian ghost story and a deeply moving morality tale, as well as a showcase for groundbreaking special effects.  Find out more at  wikipedia.org  Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Frame Ensemble featuring Irine Rosnes, Liz Hanks, Trevor Bartlett and Jonny BestNational Centre for Early Music York  Link

 

Faces Of Children (aka Visages d’enfants aka Mother) (Dir.  Jacques Feyder, Fr/Swiss, 1925) (Screening format – not known, 117mins)    A psychological drama set within Switzerland’s mountainous Haut-Valais region, Faces of Children was directed by Jacques Feyder, assisted by his actress wife, Françoise Rosay. They wrote the screenplay with Dimitri De Zoubaloff, who co-produced the film with Arthur-Adrien Porchet. The Lausanne-based producers had commissioned Feyder to make a film and he offered them the story of Faces of Children, about the estrangement of a small boy from his father and sister after his mother dies, a situation that worsens when he finds himself with a new stepmother and stepsister. The film benefits greatly from the central performance of child actor Jean Forest, whom Feyder and Rosay had discovered in the streets of Montmartre and used in a previous film, Crainequebille (screened at KenBio in 2014). The same applies to the camera work – notably a torchlight search genuinely shot at night, against the usual custom – by Abel Gance associate Léonce-Henri Burel. Many of the extras were the real-life villagers from the Haut-Valais location. Feyder shot interiors at Joinville while Rosay continued the location filming. Although production took place between May and October 1923, the release of Faces of Children was delayed until early 1925 owing to a dispute between Feyder and distributors Les Grands Films Indépendants. Although not a commercial success at the time, Faces of Children drew appreciation from critics and was eventually regarded as a landmark of realism in silent film.  Find out more at  ithankyouarthur.blogspot.com  Presented by the Kennington Bioscope.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, London  Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment with a newly commissioned score composed and performed by Chris GreenWhitby Abbey, Whitby   Link

 

27 October

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org   With live musical accompaniment by David Allison. Film Theatre, Glasgow Link

 

Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde (Dir. John S. Robertson ,US, 1920) (Screening format – not known, 79mins) Not the first cinematic version of Stevenson’s famous story but one of the most memorable with John Barrymore’s classic transformation scenes, a mixture of facial and bodily contortions as well as makeup. He tends to be hammy as the leering beast of a thug but brings a tortured struggle to the repressed doctor, horrified at the demon he’s unleashed, guilty that he enjoys Hyde’s unrestrained life of drinking and whoring and terrified that he can no longer control the transformations. Martha Mansfield co-stars as his pure and innocent sweetheart, and Nita Naldi (the vamp of Blood and Sand) has a small but memorable role as the world-weary dance-hall darling who first “wakens” Jekyll’s “baser nature”. The film uses elements from a 1887 stage version of Stevenson’s original novella by Thomas Russell Sullivan. A huge box office success on its release.  Find out more at moviessilently.com   Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Jonny Best Saltburn Theatre, Saltburn-by-the-Sea  Link

 

28 October

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Ben Gaunt, Naomi Perera, and Rob Bentall with a unique electro-acoustic score.  The Old Woollen, Pudsey  Link

 

29 October

The Ghost Train (Dir. Géza von Bolváry, Germany/UK, 1927) (Screening format – not known, 72mins)  This stylish and enjoyable comedy thriller is the first film version of the much-performed, British repertory-theatre classic. An eccentric group of travellers is stranded at a remote railway waiting room where the stationmaster tells them of a ghostly train that haunts the station, signifying death for all who have the misfortune to see it pass. A supernatural treat written by Arnold Ridley (Private Godfrey from TV’s Dad’s Army),  that balances comedic touches with a satisfyingly scary atmosphere.  And don’t miss Ilse Bois as Miss Bourne, especially after she’s had a drink.  Find out more at screenonline.org.uk  With live piano accompaniment by John Sweeney.  Hippodrome Cinema, Bo’ness Link

 

Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde (Dir. John S. Robertson ,US, 1920)  + Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922)  (Screening format – not known, **mins) Not the first cinematic version of Stevenson’s famous story but this version of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde is one of the most memorable with John Barrymore’s classic transformation scenes, a mixture of facial and bodily contortions as well as make-up. He tends to be hammy as the leering beast of a thug but brings a tortured struggle to the repressed doctor.  The film uses elements from a 1887 stage version of Stevenson’s original novella by Thomas Russell Sullivan. A huge box office success on its release.  Find out more at moviessilently.com    A German Expressionist horror masterpiece, Nosferatu stars Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an un-authorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’.    Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org With live musical accompaniment by musicians from Opera Caledonia.  St Vincents Chapel Edinburgh  Link    ** NB   Both films are apparently being shown in ‘abridged’ 40 minute versions, whatever that means !! You have been warned !

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by MinimaBrewhouse, Burton Upon Trent  Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – digital , 96mins) To celebrate the hundredth anniversary of its original release, Nosferatu gets a nationwide re-release.  A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok, the film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org.  With recorded soundtrack.   Brewery Arts Centre, Kendal   Link

 

30 October

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by improvisational group GrokGenesis Cinema, Lonon Link

 

The Golem: How He Came into the World (Dir.  Paul Wegener/Carl Boese, Ger, 1920) ( Screening format – not known, 86mins)  Suffering under the tyrannical rule of Rudolf II in 16th-century Prague, a Talmudic rabbi creates a giant warrior to protect the safety of his people. Sculpted of clay and animated by the mysterious secrets of the Cabala, the Golem was a seemingly indestructible juggernaut, performing acts of great heroism, yet equally capable of dreadful violence. When the rabbi’s assistant takes control of the Golem and attempts to use him for selfish gain, the lumbering monster runs rampant, abducting the rabbi’s daughter and setting fire to the ghetto.  Actor-director Paul Wegener made three films built around the mythical creature of Jewish legend: Golem was released in 1914, and a sequel of sorts, Der Golem und die Tänzerin, came out in 1917. This is the one film which has survived and is regarded among the landmarks of early German expressionism. Stylized sets and moody cinematography elevated The Golem above the standard features of its time, its central figure has been the focus of a number of films produced in various countries, and the name has become a generic descriptor for any lumbering creature which can’t be easily controlled.  Find out more at  albany.eduWith live piano accompaniment by Lillian HenleyPalace Cinema, Broadstairs  Link

 

Blinking Buzzards    The UK Buster Keaton Society. Quarterly meeting of the society dedicated to the appreciation of the silent comedian.   Cinema Museum, Lambeth  Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by MinimaPicture House, Thornbury  Link

 

31 October

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by Chris Green.   Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool  Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival.  With live musical accompaniment by Frame Ensemble featuring Irine Rosnes, Liz Hanks, Trevor Bartlett and Jonny BestThe Picturedrome,, Holmfirth  Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org With live musical accompaniment featuring a brand new score by  Les Hayden.   Guildhall, Leicester  Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by MinimaS4C, Carmarthen  Link

November

1 November

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by Minima. Arts Centre, Pontardawre    Link

 

2 November

South West Silents Club Night presents Richard Barthelmess, an evening exploring the life and career of this leading star of the silent era.  Barthelmess (1895 – 1963) began acting in college. Convinced by a family friend, legendary diva Alla Nazimova, to try acting professionally, he made his first film appearance in 1916 in the serial Gloria’s Romance as an extra. His next role, in War Brides (1916) opposite Nazimova attracted the attention of D W Griffith who offered him several important roles, including Broken Blossoms (1919) and Way Down East (1920).  He would become one of Hollywood‘s highest paid performers, starring in numerous classics, with his role in  Tol’able David (1921),  as a teenage mailman who finds courage,  considered by many to be his finest performance.  Presented by South West Silents.  The evening should include a feature length Barthelmess flm with recorded soundtrack.  The Landsdown Pub, Clifton, Bristol  Link

 

3 November

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by Minima Palace Theatre, Watford   Link

 

4 November

Behind The Door (Dir. Irvin Willat, 1919) (Screening format – not known, 70mins)  With America entering World War I, German-American Oscar Krug (Hobart Bosworth) is thought to be an enemy sympathizer. He fights his foes to prove that they’re wrong, then immediately enlists and is assigned to the merchant marines. The night before boarding, he marries his sweetheart, Alice Morse (Jane Novak), and she sails with him. A German submarine torpedoes the craft and sinks it. Krug and his bride board a lifeboat. The Germans take Alice and leave Krug, who swears revenge on the submarine commander.  Restored from surviving incomplete copies held at the US Library of Congress and at the Gosfilmofond, the Russian national archive so that what Kevin Brownlow called “the most outspoken of all the [WWI] vengeance films,” can now be seen in its most complete form since its release in 1919, and it is one of the ‘darkest’ silent film ever made.  Wallace Beery co-stars as the villainous German submarine commander but it is Bosworth who will stay in your memory long after the film’s shocking and brutal climax. You have been warned! Find out more at  silentfilm.org .  With live musical accompaniment by Stephen Horne.  Hippodrome Cinema, Bo’ness  Link

 

5 November

The Institute of Amateur Photographers’ Award-Winners’ Film Programme of 1935-39   In 1935, during the formative years of amateur filmmaking in Britain, the Institute of Amateur Cinematographers (IAC) sent out a package of seven award-winning films on a ‘World Tour’. Arranged in conjunction with cine clubs across the globe (including Australia, Portugal, India, and Japan), this tour represented the breadth of filmmaking styles and genres open to the amateur filmmaker. To mark the 90th anniversary of the IAC, this specially curated programme features new 2k scans of the tour films, recently digitised at the East Anglian Film Archive and Filmoteca de Catalunya.   In particular, watch out for Sister (Kichi Takeuchi, Jap, 1933) with a decidely Ozu-ish feel to it.  This is a simple but absolutely beautiful drama of a young woman visiting the grave of her younger brother to lay flowers.  Also excellent is Memmortigo (Delmir de Caralt, Sp, 1933) a surrealist collage of  images yet a film with a somewhat un-surrealist message, that optimism can triumph over pessimism.  Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth Link

 

BFI 35mm Silents From Bologna   Another outing for a recent BFI presentation at Bologna headed by Zigomar, Roi des Voleurs (France 1910) directed by Victorin-Hippolyte Jasset. Léon Sazie’s adventure serial Zigomar appeared in Paris-based newspaper Le Matin from 7 December 1909 to 22 May 1910. After this daily publication, it was also published as a brochure by the publisher Ferenczi, with catchy cover art drawn by Georges Vallée. Appearing every Wednesday at the newsstand, Sazie’s Zigomar became one of the most popular serials of this period and this popularity caused the appearance of the similar picaresque serials such as Fantômas by Marcel Allain and Pierre Souvestre. Preceding Zigomar will be Harry the Footballer (GB 1911) directed by Lewin Fitzhamon and Ferdinand Zecca’s Ali Baba et les Quarante Voleurs (France 1902) from hand-coloured nitrate.   Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth Link

 

Bright Eyes (Dir. Géza von Bolváry, Aust/GB, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 85mins)  A British-Austrian co-production – also known as Champagner –  featuring Betty Balfour, variously described as `the British Mary Pickford’ or `Britain’s Queen of Happiness’.  The film also stars Jack Trevor, and Fritz Greiner. Jenny (Balfour) works in the kitchen of a luxurious hotel. She is in love with Jean, the charming headwaiter, but Jean has his eyes on Lola, the hotel dancer, who is kept by a senile millionaire.  Jenny manages to get Jean to come see her and stupidly steals a champagne bottle for the occasion. When someone rats her out, she escapes through the corridors but her misfortune turns out to have a silver lining.   Find out more at imdb.com  Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth Link

 

Cinema’s First Nasty Women – Gender Adventures   Shorts directed by James Young Deer, Sidney Olcott, Jay Hunt, and Richard Wallace with Lillian St. Cyr (Red Wing), Gene Gauntier, Texas Guinan and Katherine Grant. Gender Adventures – From the Old West to the (now not so) distant future, women take centre stage and drive the action in this programme of adventures. Produced from 1910 to 1926, these rarely-seen silent films showcase actresses cross-dressing in adventure and comedy, assuming a range of identities that gleefully dismantle traditional gender norms and sexual constraints. On the Western frontier, young women disguise themselves as boys to seek their fortune; other films show the rambunctious gun-toting femininity cultivated out West, while we close the programme with a hilarious sex role-reversal comedy from the Hal Roach Studios.  Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth Link

 

The Wedding March (Dir.   Eric von Stroheim, US, 1928) (Screening format – 35mm, 113mins) A bittersweet look back at pre-World War I Vienna, made by its native son, Erich Von Stroheim. The Wedding March is a tour-de-force in its modern acting, engaging story and sure direction from one of the top director-screenwriters of the 20th century.  The aristocratic and somewhat jaded Prince Nicki (Stroheim), pursued by all the ladies, begins a flirtation with Mitzi (Fay Wray), a crippled harpist who works in a suburban wine-garden, and who is in turn idolized by Schani (Matthew Betz), an uncouth and violently jealous butcher.  Meanwhile, amidst the sumptuous and corrupt milieu of the family palace, Nicki is drawn into complicity against his will, as his unscrupulous mother informs him he must marry Cecelia (ZaSu Pitts) , the daughter of a wealthy commoner, in order to revive the family fortune. With passions rising, can this all end in anything other than tragedy?  The story – royalty in love with a poor commoner – had been tried before but has such twists, insights, and realism that the Russian film school, at the time, used The Wedding March as the template screenplay for its students as a model of perfection. The original release suffered commercially from the emerging competition of talking pictures but it has since gained appreciation as not just a superb example of silent cinema but one of the best films of all time.  Find out more at www.silentfilm.org .   Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth Link

 

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – not known , 96mins)   A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok, the film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org.  With live musical accompaniment by MinimaSt Mary Redcliffe, Bristol   Link

 

6 November

People on Sunday (Dir. Robert Siodmak/Edgar G Ulmer, Ger, 1929) (Screening format – not known, 74mins)  Famously, Billy Wilder and Fred Zinnemann worked with Siodmak on this landmark of realist film making, a magical blend of documentary and fiction which takes us back to a glorious summer Sunday in late-1920s Berlin where five young workers take a day off to spend a flirtatious afternoon together at a lake on the edge of the city.. While they enjoy freedoms undreamt of by their parents, sexual rivalry soon lends an edge to their flirtations.  The people portraying the characters were all amateurs belonging to a Berlin collective who, the opening credits inform us, had returned to their normal jobs by the time of the film’s release. They included a taxi driver, a record seller and a wine merchant. But together, the cast and crew produced a  classic of silent film and one which still feels remarkably modern. Find out more at archive.org  With live musical accompaniment by instrumental band Haiku Salut and pianist Meg Morley.   Barbican,  London  Link

 

Mitchell & Kenyon’s Fiction Shorts  The Mitchell & Kenyon film company was a pioneer of early commercial motion pictures based in Blackburn in Lancashire, England, at the start of the 20th century. They were originally best known for minor contributions to early fictional narrative film and Boer War dramatization films. Sagar Mitchell and James Kenyon founded the firm of Mitchell & Kenyon in 1897. Under the trade name of Norden, the company was one of the largest film producers in the United Kingdom in the 1900s, with the slogans of `Local Films For Local People’ and `We take them and make them’, they operated initially from their respective business premises at 40 Northgate and 21 King Street, Blackburn. The first reported showing of a Mitchell & Kenyon subject was a film of Blackburn Market, shown at 40 Northgate, in Blackburn, on 27 November 1897. The company produced films either on their own initiative or as commissioned by local businesses. This presentation comprises of a selection of their early fiction films preserved at The Cinema Museum.  Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth  Link

 

The Lure of Crooning Water (Dir. Arthur Rooke, GB, 1920) (Screening format – 35mm, 105mins)  This 1920 British comedy, one of several rural romances directed by Arthur Rooke, features Guy Newall, Ivy Duke and Hugh Buckler and was adapted from a novel by Marion Hill. Georgette Verlaine (Duke) is a favourite stage actress whom Dr. John Longden (Buckler) persuades to recuperate in the country because her lifestyle is ruining her health. He is in love with her and selects a pretty place called `Crooning Water’ where she stays with Horace Dornblazer (Newall), his wife Rachel (Dibley), and their three children. The fact that there is one man who does not fall for her smiles drives Georgette to try and win the admiration of Horace. Duke and Newall (who scripted this film) were married in real life and both ranked as major silent stars in England.  Ivy Duke made her last film in 1928 and never made a talkie. Newall continued to act in films in the 1930s. They divorced in 1929. They both died in 1937. Newall was in his early 50s, Duke was only 41Find out more at screenonline.org.uk   Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth  Link

 

Die Heimkehr des Odysseus (aka The Homecoming Of Odysseus, aka The Death Cheat(Dir.  Max Obal, Ger, 1922) (Screening format –  not known, ??mins)   Starring Luciano Albertini, Claire Lotto, Heinrich Schroth. The film’s sets were designed by the art director Hans Sohnle. Other than it being a silent historical drama, I can find out nothing more about this film itself.  The muscular, buoyant Luciano Albertini had first been a circus artist before turning to films as an actor, producer and director, first in Italy then in Germany where his Latin appeal made German ladies swoon. By 1920, Albertini’s feats of strength and circus acrobatics were already an established factory brand. The public knew exactly what they were getting when they entered the cinema: breathless action. The plots constructed around this basic principle were always of secondary importance to what was a winning formula.  Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth  Link

 

The Gold Diggers (Dir. Harry Beaumont, US, 1923) (Screening format – not known, ??mins) This is the premiere of a new restoration by Joshua Cattermole and Jim Groom of The Gold Diggers, a comedy directed by Harry Beaumont. The screenplay, by Grant Carpenter, was based on the play of the same title by Avery Hopwood which ran for 282 performances on Broadway in 1919 and 1920. Both the play and the film were produced by David Belasco. The film stars Hope Hampton, Wyndham Standing and Louise Fazenda. Long thought lost – along with most of a 1929 remake – The Gold Diggers has long been sought after by film scholars as the precursor of some of Busby Berkeley’s most successful musicals of the 1930s.  Long thought lost, this largely complete print  follows Wally Saunders’ attempts to marry chorus girl Violet Dayne , but his uncle, Stephen Lee objects, regarding all chorines as gold diggers  and refuses to give his approval. Violet’s friend Jerry La Mar agrees to go after Lee so aggressively that Violet will look tame by comparison and the stage is set for fireworks.  Find out more at nitrateville.com .  Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth  Link

 

Dragnet Girl (Dir. Yasujiro Ozu, 1933) (Screening format – not known,  110mins) Tokiko is an office typist who is more pleased at catching the attention of the owner’s son than he knows. That’s because her real boyfriend is Joji, a washed up boxer turned gangster and her employer is a great opportunity to milk him for them both. However, when Kazuko, the innocent sister of Hiroshi, a hopeful new member of the gang, comes to Joji to plead with him to send Hiroshi away, the gangster is attracted to her. However, Tokiko is jealous and determined to win Joji back no matter what the cost…..Yasujiro Ozu’s cool and clever gangster film is one of Japanese cinema’s masterpieces. Dazzlingly stylized, spirited and kinetic, Dragnet Girl is also an intimate, compassionate study of young people caught in the cultural cross fire. For all its snappy and whimsical homages to Warner Brothers gangster flicks (check out all of those background Hollywood gangster film posters), this is still an Ozu film, ending not with gunshots or kisses but with a still life in an empty room.  Find out more at silentfilm.org  Presented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth  Link

 

Faust (Dir. F W Murnau, Ger, 1926) (Screening format – not known, 107mins) Like Fritz Lang, F.W. Murnau is a towering figure of Weimar cinema, thanks to films such as Nosferatu (1922), The Last Laugh (1924), and, after moving to America, Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927). Murnau’s approach to framing and his use of liberating camera movements suggested to subsequent filmmakers a new way of using the pictorial space. Faust, the director’s final German film, draws on sources including Marlowe and Goethe in service of the story of a man who makes a deal with the devil. Murnau’s Faust was the most technically elaborate and expensive production undertaken by Ufa until it was surpassed by Metropolis the following year. Filming took six months, at a cost of 2 million marks, only half of which was recovered at the box office. According to many film historians, Faust seriously influenced subsequent studio shooting and special effects techniques. Murnau used two cameras, each filming multiple shots; with many scenes requiring multiple takes. Faust was Murnau’s last German film, immediately prior to his move to the US. Find out more at  rogerebert.comPresented as part of the Kennington Bioscope Silent Film Weekend.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, Lambeth  Link

 

Echoes of the North; Four Chapters in Time   This is a specially created film of rarely seen early 20th century archive footage shot around the North of England. It will be accompanied by a new score – the first ever all-brass soundtrack for a silent film – composed by Neil Brand and performed by the world-famous Brighouse and Rastrick Band. Echoes of the North has been created in partnership with Yorkshire Film Archive, North West Film Archive, North East Film Archive, and Archive Film Agency. The premiere of Echoes will be complemented by a selection of short films scored by Morecambe and Lancaster-based musicians. Presented by the Yorkshire Silent Film Festival.   Morecambe Winter Gardens, Morecambe   Link

  

12 November

Phantom Of The Opera (Dir. Rupert Julian, 1925)  (Screening format – not known, 103mins)  A title that needs no introduction, The Phantom of the Opera has spawned many remakes, remasters and sequels. This original film version, produced with moments of early Technicolour, sees Lon Chaney, the ‘Man of a Thousand Faces’ perform one of his most iconic roles. His ghastly make-up and outrageous performance made this title a benchmark in the American silent film era. The film was a critical and commercial success upon release, and still stands as an important film in cinematic history to this day, with press quotes from the time labeling the film an ‘ultra-fantastic melodrama’ (New York Times), ‘produced on a stupendous scale’ (Moving Picture World) and ‘probably the greatest inducement to nightmare that has yet been screened’ (Variety).  The mysterious phantom (Lon Chaney) is a vengeful composer living in the catacombs under the Paris Opera House, determined to promote the career of  the singer he loves (Mary Philbin).  Famed for the phantom’s shock unmasking, incredible set designs and the masked ball sequence, it still packs a punch. Find out more at wikipedia.org  With live musical accompaniment by Minima.  Tamworth Castle, Staffs Link

 

13 November

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – digital, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org Introduced by Silent Film Curator Bryony Dixon. With live piano accompaniment. BFI Southbank, London Link

 

19 November

Nosferatu (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – digital, 96mins) A German Expressionist horror masterpiece starring Max Shreck as the vampire Count Orlok.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema. In the film, Count Orlok travels across Europe leaving a trail of death in his wake.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved.  Find out more at wikipedia.org With recorded score by Hans Erdmann. BFI Southbank, London Link

 

21 November

Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror (Dir. F W Murnau, 1922) (Screening format – digital, 96mins) To mark its 100th anniversary, this is a very special screening of the recently fully restored version of  F W Murnau’s Nosferatu (1922), one of the most iconic films of the German expressionist era, let alone cinema itself.  In this first-ever screen adaptation of Bram Stoker’s novel Dracula, a simple real-estate transaction leads an intrepid businessman deep into the superstitious heart of Transylvania. There he encounters the otherworldly Count Orlok (portrayed by the legendary Max Schreck, in a performance the very backstory of which has spawned its own mythology) who soon after embarks upon a cross-continental voyage to take up residence in a distant new land… and establish his ambiguous dominion.  The film was an unauthorised adaption of  Stoker’s ‘novel with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the story.  Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaption and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed.  However, a few prints survived and the film came to be regarded as an inspirational master work of the cinema.  Brilliantly eerie, with imaginative touches which later adaptions never achieved and featuring some of the most iconic images in cinema history,  Nosferatu continues to haunt modern audiences with its unshakable power of gothic imagery and blood curdling suspense..  Find out more at www.rogerebert.com   Presented by South West Silents and Bristol Ideas.  Introduced by author and film historian Sir Christopher Frayling (plus Q&A).  With live musical accompaniment by Neil BrandSt George’s, Bristol Link

 

23 November

Tumbleweeds ( Dir. King Baggot, US, 1925) + The Gunfighter ( Dir. Wiliam S Hart, US,      1917) (Screening format – not known/digital, 78/? mins)   The Kennington Bioscope present a double-bill of westerns starring the legendary William S Hart.  First up is Tumbleweeds  which depicts the Cherokee Strip land rush of 1893. The film is said to have influenced the Oscar-winning 1931 Western Cimarron, which also depicts the land rush.  Set in Caldwell, Kansas on the Kansas-Oklahoma border, the movie features cowboy Don Carver (Hart) as a “tumbleweed” (i.e., a drifter) who decides to settle down after falling in love with Molly Lassiter (Barbara Bedford). Carver decides to get in on the Cherokee Strip land rush but when he’s arrested and parted from his new love, he’s in danger of missing the big race.  Find out more at wikipedia.org  Next up is The Gunfighter,  both directed by and starring Hart. This is the UK premiere of a new reconstruction of this previously lost film, combining an incomplete original nitrate print with two 9.5mm copies. Produced by historian and editor Christopher Bird together with Kevin Brownlow, with recreated title cards by Fritzi Kramer.  Cliff Hudspeth (Hart), the leader of a band of outlaws in Arizona, has a long list of kills to his name. He is reformed by the local seamstress (Margery Wilson), but must be prepared to kill again when the town is threatened by a rival bandit’s gang. Future stars John Gilbert and Alice Terry are rumoured to be among the extras.  This reconstruction was premiered at Pordenone in 2019, but has since been upgraded with new scans of the 9.5mm prints and some additional title cards.  Find out more at moviessilently.com  Presented by the Kennington Bioscope.  With live musical accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, London  Link

 

December

4 December

Foolish Wives (Dir. Erich von Stroheim, US, 1922) (Screening format – not known, 147mins)  In Stroheim’s 1922 film a con artist masquerades as Russian nobility and attempts to seduce the wife of an American diplomat.  When released in 1922, the film was the most expensive film made up to  that time, and billed by Universal Studios as the “first million-dollar movie” to come out of Hollywood. Originally, von Stroheim intended the film to run anywhere between 6 and 10 hours, and be shown over two evenings, but Universal executives opposed this idea. The studio bosses cut the film drastically before the release date. The opulent sets – with the California coast standing in for Monaco – shine in this glorious new restoration.  Find out more at sensesofcinema.comPresented by Bristol Ideas and South West Silents.  With recorded score by Timothy BrockArnolfini, Bristol Link

 

14 December

The Wonderful Lies of Nina Petrovna (Dir. Hanns Schwarz, Ger, 1929)  + shorts (Screening format – 9.5mm, ?mins)   David Wyatt (co-author of The 9.5mm Vintage Film Encyclopaedia) and film editor Christopher Bird present an evening celebrating the history of the first successful amateur film format, which turns 100 years old in December.  Many lost films, including many Vitagraph features, owe their existence to their 9.5mm home movie editions. A whole generation of film enthusiasts, from Ken Russell to David Lean, began with 9.5mm.  The evening will include a demonstration of a working Pathé Baby projector, and a range of films from David and Chris’s collections, projected on vintage equipment. Titles will include A Trip to the Pathé Factory, an extract from Napoleon (1927), a 9.5mm stencil colour film, a lost Harold Lloyd film, a lost scene from The Chess Player (1927), and even a lost Ivor Novello film!  The final film will be the rare The Wonderful Lies of Nina Petrovna (1929) starring Brigitte Helm, one of the last of the great German silent films made by the UFA studios before they switched to sound film production.   In the film, Helm plays Nina Petrovna, a woman who has been living quite comfortably as the mistress of a colonel in the Tsar’s army in Russia. However, she eventually encounters a penniless young lieutenant and falls madly in love with him, as he does with her. Despite her best intentions of remaining with the colonel, and his intention to avoid trouble with his fellow soldiers, they cannot forswear this relationship, and tragedy is the inevitable result. Find out more at silentfilm.orgPresented by the Kennington Bioscope.  With live piano accompaniment.  Cinema Museum, London Link